Influence of ecological momentary assessment study design features on reported willingness to participate and perceptions of potential research studies: An experimental study

Joshua M. Smyth, Dusti R. Jones, Cheng K.F. Wen, Frank T. Materia, Stefan Schneider, Arthur Stone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective Intensive ambulatory assessment, such as ecological momentary assessment (EMA), is increasingly used to capture naturalistic patient-reported outcomes. EMA design features (eg, study duration, prompt frequency) vary widely between studies, but it is not known if such design decisions influence potential subjects' willingness to participate in a study. We hypothesise that intentions to participate will be higher in studies that are less burdensome and have higher reward (eg, compensation). Design This experimental study examined if four EMA study design features (study duration, prompt frequency, prompt length, compensation) affected intentions to participate in a hypothetical EMA study and participation appraisals (eg, participation effort). Participants were randomly assigned to conditions (reflecting a fully crossed design of the four features, each with two levels). Each condition presented a vignette describing a study (each a unique combination of design features) and asked them to report on likelihood of participating and study appraisals. Participants A convenience sample of participants (n=600; 46% female, Mage=40.39) were recruited using an online service. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcomes were willingness to participate (No/Yes) and reported participation likelihood (0-100 scale). Secondary outcomes included appraisals of interest, enjoyment, effort, and if the study makes a valuable contribution to science. Results We examined main effects, and two-way interactions for participation likelihood, across study design features. Overall, reported willingness to participate and participation likelihood were high (89%, M=83.90, respectively). Shorter study duration, fewer prompts, shorter prompts and higher compensation increased willingness to participate and elicited higher participation likelihood (each associated with ∼6%-8% increases). Findings suggested that more intensive studies were judged as somewhat less interesting and enjoyable, and requiring more effort. Conclusion Hypotheses were generally supported. Design features influence behavioural intentions to participate in, and appraisals of, EMA studies. Implications for participant recruitment and generalisability, and remaining research questions, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere049154
JournalBMJ open
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 30 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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