Influence of plant physical and anatomical characteristics on the ovipositional preference of Orius sauteri (hemiptera: Anthocoridae)

Liu Zhang, Zifang Qin, Pingping Liu, Yue Yin, Gary W. Felton, Wangpeng Shi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Natural enemies play an important role in managing insect pests. Orius sauteri (Poppius) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae), a predator of many soft-body insects, is an important biological control agent in Asia. Understanding this predator’s egg-laying preferences and a habitat needs is important for its success in pest control. We investigated the plant acceptability and ovipositional preference of O. sauteri for coriander (Coriadrum sativum L., Apiales: Apiaceae), marigold (Tagetes erecta L., Asterales: Asteraceae), sweet alyssum (Lobularia maritima L., Brassicales: Brassicaceae), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L., Fabales: Fabaceae), and focused on the effects of plant physical and anatomical characteristics on the ovipositional preference of O. sauteri. The results showed that O. sauteri can lay eggs on uninfested plants in the vegetative stage and their eggs hatched normally. Orius sauteri females prefer plants with high stomatal density, a large stomatal area, and fewer trichomes as oviposition hosts, and the depth of egg placement was determined by leaf thickness. Our studies suggested that O. sauteri females can select oviposition hosts and specific oviposition sites by assessing the structural qualities of plant surface. Coriander and marigold are potentially suitable host plants for O.sauteri. The results aid the selection of cover crops to enhance natural enemies in the fields.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number326
JournalInsects
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Insect Science

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