Influence of sorption mechanisms on the bioavailability of aromatic hydrocarbons in soil

William D. Burgos, John T. Novak

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The bioavailability and extractability of sorbed naphthalene and 1-naphthol was assessed in two sandy soils. Sorption conditions were varied to estimate the extent that biologically-mediated and surface-catalyzed oxidative coupling contributed to the strong binding of these compounds to the soil matrix. After a 2 d equilibration period, the extractability of the test compounds from the soils was measured by successive solvent and alkali extractions, and the nonextracted sorbed concentrations were measured by combustion of the soil. The bioavailability of naphthalene and 1-naphthol was determined by the addition of naphthalene-degrading bacteria to soil slurry reactors after the 2 d period, and to reactors which had undergone a successive water extraction procedure. Reactors were then allowed to incubate for 90 d. Biodegradation was confirmed by 14CO2 evolution and the undegraded test compounds were measured by combustion of the soil after the 90 d period. The nonextracted sorbed concentrations were in good agreement with the biologically undegraded fractions. Biodegradation of physisorbed test compounds appeared to be controlled by the rate of desorption, and the majority of contaminants trapped in micropore sites became bioavailable over the 90 d period. Both biologically-mediated and surface-catalyzed oxidative coupling reactions were significant binding processes that greatly limited the bioavailability of 1-naphthol, and naphthalene transformation products.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages670-680
Number of pages11
StatePublished - Dec 1 1996
EventProceedings of the 1996 Specialty Conference - Washington, DC, USA
Duration: Nov 12 1996Nov 14 1996

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1996 Specialty Conference
CityWashington, DC, USA
Period11/12/9611/14/96

Fingerprint

Aromatic hydrocarbons
Sorption
Naphthalene
Soils
Naphthol
Biodegradation
Biological Availability
Desorption
Bacteria
Impurities
Water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Burgos, W. D., & Novak, J. T. (1996). Influence of sorption mechanisms on the bioavailability of aromatic hydrocarbons in soil. 670-680. Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1996 Specialty Conference, Washington, DC, USA, .
Burgos, William D. ; Novak, John T. / Influence of sorption mechanisms on the bioavailability of aromatic hydrocarbons in soil. Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1996 Specialty Conference, Washington, DC, USA, .11 p.
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Burgos, WD & Novak, JT 1996, 'Influence of sorption mechanisms on the bioavailability of aromatic hydrocarbons in soil', Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1996 Specialty Conference, Washington, DC, USA, 11/12/96 - 11/14/96 pp. 670-680.

Influence of sorption mechanisms on the bioavailability of aromatic hydrocarbons in soil. / Burgos, William D.; Novak, John T.

1996. 670-680 Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1996 Specialty Conference, Washington, DC, USA, .

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Burgos WD, Novak JT. Influence of sorption mechanisms on the bioavailability of aromatic hydrocarbons in soil. 1996. Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1996 Specialty Conference, Washington, DC, USA, .