Information seeking and emotional reactions to the September 11 terrorist attacks

Michael P. Boyle, Michael Grant Schmierbach, Cory L. Armstrong, Douglas M. McLeod, Dhavan V. Shah, Zhongdang Pan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Based on uncertainty reduction theory, this paper argues that individuals were motivated to seek information and learn about the September 11 terrorist attacks to reduce uncertainty about what happened. Results from a panel survey indicate that negative emotional response was a strong predictor of efforts to learn. Analyses also show that relative increases in newspaper, television, and Internet use from Wave 1 to Wave 2 were positively related to efforts to learn about the attacks. The findings extend uncertainty reduction theory to the mass media context thereby contributing to our understanding of uses and gratifications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-167
Number of pages13
JournalJournalism and Mass Communication Quarterly
Volume81
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

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uncertainty
Television
mass media
television
newspaper
Internet
Uncertainty

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

Cite this

Boyle, Michael P. ; Schmierbach, Michael Grant ; Armstrong, Cory L. ; McLeod, Douglas M. ; Shah, Dhavan V. ; Pan, Zhongdang. / Information seeking and emotional reactions to the September 11 terrorist attacks. In: Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly. 2004 ; Vol. 81, No. 1. pp. 155-167.
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Information seeking and emotional reactions to the September 11 terrorist attacks. / Boyle, Michael P.; Schmierbach, Michael Grant; Armstrong, Cory L.; McLeod, Douglas M.; Shah, Dhavan V.; Pan, Zhongdang.

In: Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, Vol. 81, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 155-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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