Informed consent training improves surgery resident performance in simulated encounters with standardized patients

Britta M. Thompson, Rhonda A. Sparks, Jonathan Seavey, Michelle D. Wallace, Jeremy Irvan, Alexander R. Raines, Heather McClure, Mikio A. Nihira, Jason S. Lees

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Although informed consent is vital to patient-physician communication, little training is provided to surgical trainees. We hypothesized that highlighting critical aspects of informed consent would improve resident performance. Methods Eighty (out of 88) surgical postgraduate year 1 surgical residents were randomly assigned to one of the 2 cases (laparoscopic cholecystectomy or ventral herniorrhaphy) and instructed to obtain and document informed consent with a standardized patient (SP) followed by a didactic training session. The residents then obtained and documented informed consent with the other case with the other SP. SPs graded encounters ("Checklist"); trained raters graded notes. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to determine differences between pre- and post-training and Checklist versus "Note" scores. Results Statistically significant pre- to post differences for Note (P <.01) and Checklist (P <.01) along with significant differences between Note and Checklist (P <.01) were noted. Conclusions Training improved surgery residents' ability to discuss and document informed consent. Despite this improvement, significant differences between discussion and documentation persisted. Documentation training is a future area for improvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)578-584
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume210
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

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