Inhibitor treatment using unactivated prothrombin complex concentrates: the Pennsylvania experience--1978-1982.

M. E. Eyster, J. A. Spero, P. M. Catalano, F. M. Gill, C. J. Lusch, M. K. Kajani, L. E. Barron, H. P. DeGreen, S. S. Shapiro, J. H. Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Data were analyzed on 48 patients with Factor VIII:C inhibitors, 31 of whom were treated with more than 6.7 million units of unactivated prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) during the years 1978 through 1982 for more than 1,000 bleeding episodes. Twelve of the patients who were on home therapy used 3.1 million units, or 47% of the total PCC usage. Only one patient had a severe life-threatening allergic reaction to PCC, and no thrombotic complications were observed, supporting the concept that these products are safe when used in doses of 50-75 u/Kg. Fifty percent of hemarthroses and 65% of muscle hemorrhages were treated with no more than two infusions per episode, suggesting that PCC was effective at least half of the time. Comparison of the number of days hospitalized per year for inhibitor and non-inhibitor patients also indicated that PCC was effective, although not as effective as AHF therapy in non-inhibitor patients. The life styles of PCC treated patients were comparable to what might be expected for non-inhibitor patients with severe disease, and no deaths were attributed to PCC treatment failure during the four year period. Of major concern, however, was the cost of therapy. In 1981-82, the average use of PCC for inhibitor patients was 106,000 units per treated patient per year, compared to 40,000 AHF units for all Factor VIII deficient treated patients per year. Much of this usage was for recurrent hemarthroses in a small number of patients requiring eight or more infusions per episode.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-322
Number of pages14
JournalProgress in Clinical and Biological Research
Volume150
StatePublished - 1984

Fingerprint

Therapeutics
Hemarthrosis
Factor VIII
prothrombin complex concentrates
Hemorrhage
Treatment Failure
Life Style
Hypersensitivity
Costs and Cost Analysis
Muscles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Eyster, M. E., Spero, J. A., Catalano, P. M., Gill, F. M., Lusch, C. J., Kajani, M. K., ... Lewis, J. H. (1984). Inhibitor treatment using unactivated prothrombin complex concentrates: the Pennsylvania experience--1978-1982. Progress in Clinical and Biological Research, 150, 309-322.
Eyster, M. E. ; Spero, J. A. ; Catalano, P. M. ; Gill, F. M. ; Lusch, C. J. ; Kajani, M. K. ; Barron, L. E. ; DeGreen, H. P. ; Shapiro, S. S. ; Lewis, J. H. / Inhibitor treatment using unactivated prothrombin complex concentrates : the Pennsylvania experience--1978-1982. In: Progress in Clinical and Biological Research. 1984 ; Vol. 150. pp. 309-322.
@article{896ad80cf7034256912e52fe9ef5dde4,
title = "Inhibitor treatment using unactivated prothrombin complex concentrates: the Pennsylvania experience--1978-1982.",
abstract = "Data were analyzed on 48 patients with Factor VIII:C inhibitors, 31 of whom were treated with more than 6.7 million units of unactivated prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) during the years 1978 through 1982 for more than 1,000 bleeding episodes. Twelve of the patients who were on home therapy used 3.1 million units, or 47{\%} of the total PCC usage. Only one patient had a severe life-threatening allergic reaction to PCC, and no thrombotic complications were observed, supporting the concept that these products are safe when used in doses of 50-75 u/Kg. Fifty percent of hemarthroses and 65{\%} of muscle hemorrhages were treated with no more than two infusions per episode, suggesting that PCC was effective at least half of the time. Comparison of the number of days hospitalized per year for inhibitor and non-inhibitor patients also indicated that PCC was effective, although not as effective as AHF therapy in non-inhibitor patients. The life styles of PCC treated patients were comparable to what might be expected for non-inhibitor patients with severe disease, and no deaths were attributed to PCC treatment failure during the four year period. Of major concern, however, was the cost of therapy. In 1981-82, the average use of PCC for inhibitor patients was 106,000 units per treated patient per year, compared to 40,000 AHF units for all Factor VIII deficient treated patients per year. Much of this usage was for recurrent hemarthroses in a small number of patients requiring eight or more infusions per episode.",
author = "Eyster, {M. E.} and Spero, {J. A.} and Catalano, {P. M.} and Gill, {F. M.} and Lusch, {C. J.} and Kajani, {M. K.} and Barron, {L. E.} and DeGreen, {H. P.} and Shapiro, {S. S.} and Lewis, {J. H.}",
year = "1984",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "150",
pages = "309--322",
journal = "Progress in Clinical and Biological Research",
issn = "0361-7742",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",

}

Eyster, ME, Spero, JA, Catalano, PM, Gill, FM, Lusch, CJ, Kajani, MK, Barron, LE, DeGreen, HP, Shapiro, SS & Lewis, JH 1984, 'Inhibitor treatment using unactivated prothrombin complex concentrates: the Pennsylvania experience--1978-1982.', Progress in Clinical and Biological Research, vol. 150, pp. 309-322.

Inhibitor treatment using unactivated prothrombin complex concentrates : the Pennsylvania experience--1978-1982. / Eyster, M. E.; Spero, J. A.; Catalano, P. M.; Gill, F. M.; Lusch, C. J.; Kajani, M. K.; Barron, L. E.; DeGreen, H. P.; Shapiro, S. S.; Lewis, J. H.

In: Progress in Clinical and Biological Research, Vol. 150, 1984, p. 309-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inhibitor treatment using unactivated prothrombin complex concentrates

T2 - the Pennsylvania experience--1978-1982.

AU - Eyster, M. E.

AU - Spero, J. A.

AU - Catalano, P. M.

AU - Gill, F. M.

AU - Lusch, C. J.

AU - Kajani, M. K.

AU - Barron, L. E.

AU - DeGreen, H. P.

AU - Shapiro, S. S.

AU - Lewis, J. H.

PY - 1984

Y1 - 1984

N2 - Data were analyzed on 48 patients with Factor VIII:C inhibitors, 31 of whom were treated with more than 6.7 million units of unactivated prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) during the years 1978 through 1982 for more than 1,000 bleeding episodes. Twelve of the patients who were on home therapy used 3.1 million units, or 47% of the total PCC usage. Only one patient had a severe life-threatening allergic reaction to PCC, and no thrombotic complications were observed, supporting the concept that these products are safe when used in doses of 50-75 u/Kg. Fifty percent of hemarthroses and 65% of muscle hemorrhages were treated with no more than two infusions per episode, suggesting that PCC was effective at least half of the time. Comparison of the number of days hospitalized per year for inhibitor and non-inhibitor patients also indicated that PCC was effective, although not as effective as AHF therapy in non-inhibitor patients. The life styles of PCC treated patients were comparable to what might be expected for non-inhibitor patients with severe disease, and no deaths were attributed to PCC treatment failure during the four year period. Of major concern, however, was the cost of therapy. In 1981-82, the average use of PCC for inhibitor patients was 106,000 units per treated patient per year, compared to 40,000 AHF units for all Factor VIII deficient treated patients per year. Much of this usage was for recurrent hemarthroses in a small number of patients requiring eight or more infusions per episode.

AB - Data were analyzed on 48 patients with Factor VIII:C inhibitors, 31 of whom were treated with more than 6.7 million units of unactivated prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) during the years 1978 through 1982 for more than 1,000 bleeding episodes. Twelve of the patients who were on home therapy used 3.1 million units, or 47% of the total PCC usage. Only one patient had a severe life-threatening allergic reaction to PCC, and no thrombotic complications were observed, supporting the concept that these products are safe when used in doses of 50-75 u/Kg. Fifty percent of hemarthroses and 65% of muscle hemorrhages were treated with no more than two infusions per episode, suggesting that PCC was effective at least half of the time. Comparison of the number of days hospitalized per year for inhibitor and non-inhibitor patients also indicated that PCC was effective, although not as effective as AHF therapy in non-inhibitor patients. The life styles of PCC treated patients were comparable to what might be expected for non-inhibitor patients with severe disease, and no deaths were attributed to PCC treatment failure during the four year period. Of major concern, however, was the cost of therapy. In 1981-82, the average use of PCC for inhibitor patients was 106,000 units per treated patient per year, compared to 40,000 AHF units for all Factor VIII deficient treated patients per year. Much of this usage was for recurrent hemarthroses in a small number of patients requiring eight or more infusions per episode.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=17444450715&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=17444450715&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 6431435

AN - SCOPUS:17444450715

VL - 150

SP - 309

EP - 322

JO - Progress in Clinical and Biological Research

JF - Progress in Clinical and Biological Research

SN - 0361-7742

ER -