16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction Local coalitions combine the knowledge, expertise, and resources of many individuals and organizations to improve community health. This article describes data from 11 rural cancer coalitions in Pennsylvania and New York collected through a model-based data system. Methods The coalition data collection system was adapted from a conceptual model designed to monitor the activities and impact of cardiovascular disease coalitions. Community Coalition Action Theory was used during implementation and validation of the data system. Primary components of the data system were organizational capacity, process, and outcome/impact. Results From 2002 to 2004, the 11 coalitions conducted 1369 initiatives, including 1147 (83.8%) interventions and 222 (16.2%) development activities. Among interventions, 776 (56.7%) were outreach only, 158 (11.5%) education only, 117 (8.5%) outreach and education, and 96 (7.0%) screening. Differences in the distribution of initiatives by coalition, cancer site, and target audience were statistically significant (P <.05). The majority of interventions focused on colorectal (37.0%) and breast (32.9%) cancer. Target groups included women (71.3%), rural residents (32.6%), survivors (21.8%), and low-income (21.8%) individuals. Although not statistically significant, an observed 3-year trend was shown for decreased outreach interventiions and increased education and screening interventions. In total, 1951 of 3981 individuals who were offered a cancer screening (49%) completed screening, and 15 sustainable community changes were documented. Conclusion This study reports the initiatives and impact of 11 rural community cancer coalitions over a 3-year period. This study estimates the mix of development activities and community interventions, against which this coalition network and others may be compared.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number45
JournalPreventing Chronic Disease
Volume3
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

Fingerprint

Information Systems
Education
Neoplasms
Rural Population
Early Detection of Cancer
Survivors
Cardiovascular Diseases
Organizations
Breast Neoplasms
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Kluhsman, Brenda C. ; Bencivenga, Marcyann ; Ward, Ann J. ; Lehman, Erik ; Lengerich, Eugene. / Initiatives of 11 rural appalachian cancer coalitions in Pennsylvania and New York. In: Preventing Chronic Disease. 2006 ; Vol. 3, No. 4.
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title = "Initiatives of 11 rural appalachian cancer coalitions in Pennsylvania and New York",
abstract = "Introduction Local coalitions combine the knowledge, expertise, and resources of many individuals and organizations to improve community health. This article describes data from 11 rural cancer coalitions in Pennsylvania and New York collected through a model-based data system. Methods The coalition data collection system was adapted from a conceptual model designed to monitor the activities and impact of cardiovascular disease coalitions. Community Coalition Action Theory was used during implementation and validation of the data system. Primary components of the data system were organizational capacity, process, and outcome/impact. Results From 2002 to 2004, the 11 coalitions conducted 1369 initiatives, including 1147 (83.8{\%}) interventions and 222 (16.2{\%}) development activities. Among interventions, 776 (56.7{\%}) were outreach only, 158 (11.5{\%}) education only, 117 (8.5{\%}) outreach and education, and 96 (7.0{\%}) screening. Differences in the distribution of initiatives by coalition, cancer site, and target audience were statistically significant (P <.05). The majority of interventions focused on colorectal (37.0{\%}) and breast (32.9{\%}) cancer. Target groups included women (71.3{\%}), rural residents (32.6{\%}), survivors (21.8{\%}), and low-income (21.8{\%}) individuals. Although not statistically significant, an observed 3-year trend was shown for decreased outreach interventiions and increased education and screening interventions. In total, 1951 of 3981 individuals who were offered a cancer screening (49{\%}) completed screening, and 15 sustainable community changes were documented. Conclusion This study reports the initiatives and impact of 11 rural community cancer coalitions over a 3-year period. This study estimates the mix of development activities and community interventions, against which this coalition network and others may be compared.",
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Initiatives of 11 rural appalachian cancer coalitions in Pennsylvania and New York. / Kluhsman, Brenda C.; Bencivenga, Marcyann; Ward, Ann J.; Lehman, Erik; Lengerich, Eugene.

In: Preventing Chronic Disease, Vol. 3, No. 4, 45, 01.01.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Initiatives of 11 rural appalachian cancer coalitions in Pennsylvania and New York

AU - Kluhsman, Brenda C.

AU - Bencivenga, Marcyann

AU - Ward, Ann J.

AU - Lehman, Erik

AU - Lengerich, Eugene

PY - 2006/1/1

Y1 - 2006/1/1

N2 - Introduction Local coalitions combine the knowledge, expertise, and resources of many individuals and organizations to improve community health. This article describes data from 11 rural cancer coalitions in Pennsylvania and New York collected through a model-based data system. Methods The coalition data collection system was adapted from a conceptual model designed to monitor the activities and impact of cardiovascular disease coalitions. Community Coalition Action Theory was used during implementation and validation of the data system. Primary components of the data system were organizational capacity, process, and outcome/impact. Results From 2002 to 2004, the 11 coalitions conducted 1369 initiatives, including 1147 (83.8%) interventions and 222 (16.2%) development activities. Among interventions, 776 (56.7%) were outreach only, 158 (11.5%) education only, 117 (8.5%) outreach and education, and 96 (7.0%) screening. Differences in the distribution of initiatives by coalition, cancer site, and target audience were statistically significant (P <.05). The majority of interventions focused on colorectal (37.0%) and breast (32.9%) cancer. Target groups included women (71.3%), rural residents (32.6%), survivors (21.8%), and low-income (21.8%) individuals. Although not statistically significant, an observed 3-year trend was shown for decreased outreach interventiions and increased education and screening interventions. In total, 1951 of 3981 individuals who were offered a cancer screening (49%) completed screening, and 15 sustainable community changes were documented. Conclusion This study reports the initiatives and impact of 11 rural community cancer coalitions over a 3-year period. This study estimates the mix of development activities and community interventions, against which this coalition network and others may be compared.

AB - Introduction Local coalitions combine the knowledge, expertise, and resources of many individuals and organizations to improve community health. This article describes data from 11 rural cancer coalitions in Pennsylvania and New York collected through a model-based data system. Methods The coalition data collection system was adapted from a conceptual model designed to monitor the activities and impact of cardiovascular disease coalitions. Community Coalition Action Theory was used during implementation and validation of the data system. Primary components of the data system were organizational capacity, process, and outcome/impact. Results From 2002 to 2004, the 11 coalitions conducted 1369 initiatives, including 1147 (83.8%) interventions and 222 (16.2%) development activities. Among interventions, 776 (56.7%) were outreach only, 158 (11.5%) education only, 117 (8.5%) outreach and education, and 96 (7.0%) screening. Differences in the distribution of initiatives by coalition, cancer site, and target audience were statistically significant (P <.05). The majority of interventions focused on colorectal (37.0%) and breast (32.9%) cancer. Target groups included women (71.3%), rural residents (32.6%), survivors (21.8%), and low-income (21.8%) individuals. Although not statistically significant, an observed 3-year trend was shown for decreased outreach interventiions and increased education and screening interventions. In total, 1951 of 3981 individuals who were offered a cancer screening (49%) completed screening, and 15 sustainable community changes were documented. Conclusion This study reports the initiatives and impact of 11 rural community cancer coalitions over a 3-year period. This study estimates the mix of development activities and community interventions, against which this coalition network and others may be compared.

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