Innovative materials processing strategies

A biomimetic approach

A. H. Heuer, D. J. Fink, V. J. Laraia, J. L. Arias, P. D. Calvert, K. Kendall, Gary Lynn Messing, J. Blackwell, P. C. Rieke, D. H. Thompson, A. P. Wheeler, A. Veis, A. I. Caplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

489 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many organisms construct structural ceramic (biomineral) composites from seemingly mundane materials; cell-mediated processes control both the nucleation and growth of mineral and the development of composite microarchitecture. Living systems fabricate biocomposites by: (i) confining biomineralization within specific subunit compartments; (ii) producing a specific mineral with defined crystal size and orientation; and (iii) packaging many incremental units together in a moving front process to form fully densified, macroscopic structures. By adapting biological principles, materials scientists are attempting to produce novel materials. To date, neither the elegance of the biomineral assembly mechanisms nor the intricate composite microarchitectures have been duplicated by nonbiological processing. However, substantial progress has been made in the understanding of how biomineralization occurs, and the first steps are now being taken to exploit the basic principles involved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1098-1105
Number of pages8
JournalScience
Volume255
Issue number5048
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Biomimetics
Minerals
Ceramics
Product Packaging
Growth and Development

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Heuer, A. H., Fink, D. J., Laraia, V. J., Arias, J. L., Calvert, P. D., Kendall, K., ... Caplan, A. I. (1992). Innovative materials processing strategies: A biomimetic approach. Science, 255(5048), 1098-1105.
Heuer, A. H. ; Fink, D. J. ; Laraia, V. J. ; Arias, J. L. ; Calvert, P. D. ; Kendall, K. ; Messing, Gary Lynn ; Blackwell, J. ; Rieke, P. C. ; Thompson, D. H. ; Wheeler, A. P. ; Veis, A. ; Caplan, A. I. / Innovative materials processing strategies : A biomimetic approach. In: Science. 1992 ; Vol. 255, No. 5048. pp. 1098-1105.
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Heuer, AH, Fink, DJ, Laraia, VJ, Arias, JL, Calvert, PD, Kendall, K, Messing, GL, Blackwell, J, Rieke, PC, Thompson, DH, Wheeler, AP, Veis, A & Caplan, AI 1992, 'Innovative materials processing strategies: A biomimetic approach', Science, vol. 255, no. 5048, pp. 1098-1105.

Innovative materials processing strategies : A biomimetic approach. / Heuer, A. H.; Fink, D. J.; Laraia, V. J.; Arias, J. L.; Calvert, P. D.; Kendall, K.; Messing, Gary Lynn; Blackwell, J.; Rieke, P. C.; Thompson, D. H.; Wheeler, A. P.; Veis, A.; Caplan, A. I.

In: Science, Vol. 255, No. 5048, 01.01.1992, p. 1098-1105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Heuer, A. H.

AU - Fink, D. J.

AU - Laraia, V. J.

AU - Arias, J. L.

AU - Calvert, P. D.

AU - Kendall, K.

AU - Messing, Gary Lynn

AU - Blackwell, J.

AU - Rieke, P. C.

AU - Thompson, D. H.

AU - Wheeler, A. P.

AU - Veis, A.

AU - Caplan, A. I.

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Heuer AH, Fink DJ, Laraia VJ, Arias JL, Calvert PD, Kendall K et al. Innovative materials processing strategies: A biomimetic approach. Science. 1992 Jan 1;255(5048):1098-1105.