INSIGHT responsive parenting intervention is associated with healthier patterns of dietary exposures in infants

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether a responsive parenting (RP) intervention affects infant dietary patterns. Methods: Primiparous mother-newborn dyads (n = 291) were randomized to the Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories (INSIGHT) RP intervention or control. Curricula were delivered at nurse home visits at ages 3, 16, 28, and 40 weeks. RP group feeding guidance advised responsive feeding, delayed introduction of solids, repeated exposure to novel foods, and age-appropriate portion sizes. Latent class analysis identified patterns of dietary exposure at 9 months. Class membership at 9 months was used to predict BMI percentile at 2 years. Results: Five dietary patterns were identified: “Breastfed, Fruits and Vegetables,” “Breastfed, Low Variety,” “Formula, Fruits and Vegetables,” “Formula, Low Variety,” and “Formula, High Energy Density.” Over 60% of infants had patterns low in fruits and vegetables or high in energy-dense foods. RP group infants were less likely than control to be in the “Formula, Low Variety” class (OR = 0.40, 95% CI 0.23–0.71) or “Formula, High Energy Density” class (OR = 0.28, 95% CI 0.12–0.61) relative to the “Formula, Fruits and Vegetables” class. Dietary pattern at 9 months was significantly associated with BMI percentile at 2 years. Conclusions: While a majority of infants consumed diets low in fruits and vegetables, the INSIGHT RP intervention was associated with healthier dietary patterns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)185-191
Number of pages7
JournalObesity
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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