Insights from agriculture for the management of insecticide resistance in disease vectors

Eleanore D. Sternberg, Matthew B. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Key to contemporary management of diseases such as malaria, dengue, and filariasis is control of the insect vectors responsible for transmission. Insecticide-based interventions have contributed to declines in disease burdens in many areas, but this progress could be threatened by the emergence of insecticide resistance in vector populations. Insecticide resistance is likewise a major concern in agriculture, where insect pests can cause substantial yield losses. Here, we explore overlaps between understanding and managing insecticide resistance in agriculture and in public health. We have used the Global Plan for Insecticide Resistance Management in malaria vectors, developed under the auspices of the World Health Organization Global Malaria Program, as a framework for this exploration because it serves as one of the few cohesive documents for managing a global insecticide resistance crisis. Generally, this comparison highlights some fundamental differences between insect control in agriculture and in public health. Moreover, we emphasize that the success of insecticide resistance management strategies is strongly dependent on the biological specifics of each system. We suggest that the biological, operational, and regulatory differences between agriculture and public health limit the wholesale transfer of knowledge and practices from one system to the other. Nonetheless, there are some valuable insights from agriculture that could assist in advancing the existing Global Plan for Insecticide Resistance Management framework.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)404-414
Number of pages11
JournalEvolutionary Applications
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2018

Fingerprint

Insecticide Resistance
disease vector
Disease Vectors
disease vectors
insecticide resistance
Agriculture
insecticide
agriculture
resistance management
malaria
Malaria
public health
Public Health
insect
Insect Vectors
Insect Control
filariasis
Filariasis
burden of disease
insect vectors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

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Insights from agriculture for the management of insecticide resistance in disease vectors. / Sternberg, Eleanore D.; Thomas, Matthew B.

In: Evolutionary Applications, Vol. 11, No. 4, 04.2018, p. 404-414.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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