Instant Annotation: Early design experiences in supporting cross-cultural group chat

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cross-cultural group chat is an important option for supporting communication in both industry and education settings. However, studies of such interactions have reported persistent communication problems that appear to be due to mismatches in non-native and native speakers' language proficiency. With this problem in mind, we have been exploring a conceptual design called Instant Annotation. Our design concept supports a kind of threading in chat using annotation, thus offering para-communication support in cross-cultural group chat. As part of this design investigation, we studied native and non-native speakers in a group chat activity, shared the new design concept, and interviewed users to gather their feedback about the Instant Annotation concept. The results pointed to three different design use cases and led us to envision four general design features that we will explore in our ongoing work. We discuss the cross-cultural communication problem, findings from the interview study, the current design and future directions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSIGDOC'12 - Proceedings of the 30th ACM International Conference on Design of Communication
Pages147-155
Number of pages9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Event30th ACM International Conference on Design of Communication, SIGDOC 2012 - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: Oct 3 2012Oct 5 2012

Publication series

NameSIGDOC'12 - Proceedings of the 30th ACM International Conference on Design of Communication

Other

Other30th ACM International Conference on Design of Communication, SIGDOC 2012
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period10/3/1210/5/12

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Networks and Communications

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Instant Annotation: Early design experiences in supporting cross-cultural group chat'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this