Integrating and coordinating care between the Women, Infants, and Children Program and pediatricians to improve patient-centered preventive care for healthy growth

Lisa Bailey-Davis, Samantha M.R. Kling, William J. Cochran, Sandra Hassink, Lindsey Hess, Jennifer Franceschelli Hosterman, Shawnee Lutcher, Michele Marini, Jacob Mowery, Ian M. Paul, Jennifer S. Savage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract New care delivery models call for integrating health services to coordinate care and improve patient-centeredness. Such models have been embraced to coordinate care with evidence-based strategies to prevent obesity. Both the Special Supplemental Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Program and pediatricians are considered credible sources of preventive guidance, and coordinating these independent siloes would benefit a vulnerable population. Using semistructured focus groups and interviews, we evaluated practices, messaging, and the prospect of integrating and coordinating care. Across Pennsylvania, WIC nutritionists (n = 35), pediatricians (n = 15), and parents (N = 28) of an infant or toddler participated in 2016. Three themes were identified: health assessment data sharing (e.g., iron, growth measures), benefits and barriers to integrated health services, and coordinating care to reduce conflicting educational messages (e.g., breastfeeding, juice, introduction of solids). Stakeholders supported sharing health assessment data and integrating health services as strategies to enhance the quality of care, but were concerned about security and confidentiality. Overall, integrated, coordinated care was perceived to be an acceptable strategy to facilitate consistent, preventive education and improve patient-centeredness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)944-952
Number of pages9
JournalTranslational behavioral medicine
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 21 2018

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Food Assistance
Patient-Centered Care
Preventive Medicine
Health Services
Growth
Nutritionists
Information Dissemination
Quality of Health Care
Confidentiality
Health
Vulnerable Populations
Patient Education
Breast Feeding
Focus Groups
Patient Care
Iron
Obesity
Parents
Interviews
Pediatricians

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Bailey-Davis, Lisa ; Kling, Samantha M.R. ; Cochran, William J. ; Hassink, Sandra ; Hess, Lindsey ; Franceschelli Hosterman, Jennifer ; Lutcher, Shawnee ; Marini, Michele ; Mowery, Jacob ; Paul, Ian M. ; Savage, Jennifer S. / Integrating and coordinating care between the Women, Infants, and Children Program and pediatricians to improve patient-centered preventive care for healthy growth. In: Translational behavioral medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 8, No. 6. pp. 944-952.
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Integrating and coordinating care between the Women, Infants, and Children Program and pediatricians to improve patient-centered preventive care for healthy growth. / Bailey-Davis, Lisa; Kling, Samantha M.R.; Cochran, William J.; Hassink, Sandra; Hess, Lindsey; Franceschelli Hosterman, Jennifer; Lutcher, Shawnee; Marini, Michele; Mowery, Jacob; Paul, Ian M.; Savage, Jennifer S.

In: Translational behavioral medicine, Vol. 8, No. 6, 21.11.2018, p. 944-952.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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