Abstract

Mental health programs to improve problem-solving skills and reduce stress through social gameplay can improve psychiatric outcomes, but little is known about whether adult patients are interested in using them. Primary care patients (n = 467) completed a cross-sectional survey to assess interest in using 2 types of group programs for mental health. A significantly greater percentage (23.7%) of patients expressed interest in a gameplay-based program than in interpersonal therapy (17.6%) (P < .001). Lonely patients and younger patients were more likely to report interest in gameplay. Results suggest that diverse patient populations are interested in using gameplay programs for mental health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number170488
JournalPreventing Chronic Disease
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

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Primary Health Care
Mental Health
Psychiatry
Cross-Sectional Studies
Population
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Interest among primary care patients in group problem-solving gameplay for mental health",
abstract = "Mental health programs to improve problem-solving skills and reduce stress through social gameplay can improve psychiatric outcomes, but little is known about whether adult patients are interested in using them. Primary care patients (n = 467) completed a cross-sectional survey to assess interest in using 2 types of group programs for mental health. A significantly greater percentage (23.7{\%}) of patients expressed interest in a gameplay-based program than in interpersonal therapy (17.6{\%}) (P < .001). Lonely patients and younger patients were more likely to report interest in gameplay. Results suggest that diverse patient populations are interested in using gameplay programs for mental health.",
author = "Brandon Auer and Christopher Sciamanna and Smyth, {Joshua Morrison} and Cristina Truica and Leah Cream and Dahlia Mukherjee",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.5888/pcd15.170488",
language = "English (US)",
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AU - Sciamanna, Christopher

AU - Smyth, Joshua Morrison

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AU - Cream, Leah

AU - Mukherjee, Dahlia

PY - 2018/6/1

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N2 - Mental health programs to improve problem-solving skills and reduce stress through social gameplay can improve psychiatric outcomes, but little is known about whether adult patients are interested in using them. Primary care patients (n = 467) completed a cross-sectional survey to assess interest in using 2 types of group programs for mental health. A significantly greater percentage (23.7%) of patients expressed interest in a gameplay-based program than in interpersonal therapy (17.6%) (P < .001). Lonely patients and younger patients were more likely to report interest in gameplay. Results suggest that diverse patient populations are interested in using gameplay programs for mental health.

AB - Mental health programs to improve problem-solving skills and reduce stress through social gameplay can improve psychiatric outcomes, but little is known about whether adult patients are interested in using them. Primary care patients (n = 467) completed a cross-sectional survey to assess interest in using 2 types of group programs for mental health. A significantly greater percentage (23.7%) of patients expressed interest in a gameplay-based program than in interpersonal therapy (17.6%) (P < .001). Lonely patients and younger patients were more likely to report interest in gameplay. Results suggest that diverse patient populations are interested in using gameplay programs for mental health.

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