Interfacial materials with special wettability

Tak Sing Wong, Taolei Sun, Lin Feng, Joanna Aizenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Scopus citations

Abstract

Various life forms in nature display a high level of adaptability to their environments through the use of sophisticated material interfaces. This is exemplified by numerous biological systems, such as the self-cleaning of lotus leaves, the water-walking abilities of water striders and spiders, the ultra-slipperiness of pitcher plants, the directional liquid adhesion of butterfly wings, and the water collection capabilities of beetles, spider webs, and cacti. The versatile interactions of these natural surfaces with fluids, or special wettability, are enabled by their unique micro/nanoscale surface structures and intrinsic material properties. Many of these biological designs and principles have inspired new classes of functional interfacial materials, which have remarkable potential to solve some of the engineering challenges for industrial and biomedical applications. In this article, we provide a snapshot of the state of the art of biologically inspired materials with special wettability, and discuss some promising future directions for the field.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)366-371
Number of pages6
JournalMRS Bulletin
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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