Interleukin-13 and transforming growth factor-β1 inhibit spontaneous sleep in rabbits

Takeshi Kubota, Jidong Fang, Tetsuya Kushikata, James M. Krueger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α are involved in physiological sleep regulation. Interleukin (IL)-13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 are anti-inflammatory cytokines that inhibit proinflammatory cytokines by several mechanisms. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-13 and TGF-β1 could attenuate sleep in rabbits. Three doses of IL-13 (8, 40, and 200 ng) and TGF-β1 (40, 100, and 200 ng) were injected intracerebroventricularly 3 h after the beginning of the light period. In addition, one dose of IL-13 (200 ng) and one dose of TGF-β1 (200 ng) were injected at dark onset. The two higher doses of IL-13 and the highest dose of TGF-β1 significantly inhibited spontanenous non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) when they were given in the light period. IL-13 also inhibited NREMS after dark onset administration; however, the inhibitory effect was less potent than that observed after light period administration. The 40-ng dose of IL-13 inhibited REMS duration during the dark period. TGF-β1 administered at dark onset had no effect on sleep. These data provide additional evidence for the hypothesis that a brain cytokine network is involved in regulation of physiological sleep.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume279
Issue number3 48-3
StatePublished - Oct 3 2000

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Interleukin-13
Transforming Growth Factors
Sleep
Rabbits
Cytokines
Eye Movements
Light
Interleukin-8
Interleukin-1
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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abstract = "Proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α are involved in physiological sleep regulation. Interleukin (IL)-13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 are anti-inflammatory cytokines that inhibit proinflammatory cytokines by several mechanisms. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-13 and TGF-β1 could attenuate sleep in rabbits. Three doses of IL-13 (8, 40, and 200 ng) and TGF-β1 (40, 100, and 200 ng) were injected intracerebroventricularly 3 h after the beginning of the light period. In addition, one dose of IL-13 (200 ng) and one dose of TGF-β1 (200 ng) were injected at dark onset. The two higher doses of IL-13 and the highest dose of TGF-β1 significantly inhibited spontanenous non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) when they were given in the light period. IL-13 also inhibited NREMS after dark onset administration; however, the inhibitory effect was less potent than that observed after light period administration. The 40-ng dose of IL-13 inhibited REMS duration during the dark period. TGF-β1 administered at dark onset had no effect on sleep. These data provide additional evidence for the hypothesis that a brain cytokine network is involved in regulation of physiological sleep.",
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Interleukin-13 and transforming growth factor-β1 inhibit spontaneous sleep in rabbits. / Kubota, Takeshi; Fang, Jidong; Kushikata, Tetsuya; Krueger, James M.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 279, No. 3 48-3, 03.10.2000.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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