Interparental conflict in context: Exploring relations between parenting processes and children's conflict appraisals

Renee L. DeBoard-Lucas, Gregory M. Fosco, Sarah R. Raynor, John H. Grych

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

62 Scopus citations

Abstract

Children's appraisals of conflict are a mechanism by which parental discord can lead to child maladjustment. The cognitive-contextual framework proposes that parent-child relationships may affect how children perceive conflict, but this idea has rarely been examined empirically. This study investigated relations between conflict appraisals, parenting, and child adjustment in a sample of 150 8- to 12-year-old children, using a multi-informant, multimethod design. Mothers' coercive/controlling and emotionally unsupportive parenting magnified the relation between conflict and children's self-blame; emotionally supportive parenting diminished this association. Children's secure attachment with fathers was linked with less threat and self-blame; more security reduced self-blame for conflict. Data suggest that supportive, responsive parenting can buffer the effects of interparental conflict on children by reducing self-blaming attributions for parental discord.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-175
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Interparental conflict in context: Exploring relations between parenting processes and children's conflict appraisals'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this