Intervention effects on safety compliance and citizenship behaviors: Evidence from the work, family, and health study

Leslie B. Hammer, Ryan C. Johnson, Tori L. Crain, Todd Bodner, Ellen Ernst Kossek, Kelly D. Davis, Erin L. Kelly, Orfeu M. Buxton, Georgia Karuntzos, L. Casey Chosewood, Lisa Berkman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We tested the effects of a work-family intervention on employee reports of safety compliance and organizational citizenship behaviors in 30 health care facilities using a group-randomized trial. Based on conservation of resources theory and the work-home resources model, we hypothesized that implementing a work-family intervention aimed at increasing contextual resources via supervisor support for work and family, and employee control over work time, would lead to improved personal resources and increased employee performance on the job in the form of self-reported safety compliance and organizational citizenship behaviors. Multilevel analyses used survey data from 1,524 employees at baseline and at 6-month and 12-month postintervention follow-ups. Significant intervention effects were observed for safety compliance at the 6-month, and organizational citizenship behaviors at the 12-month, followups. More specifically, results demonstrate that the intervention protected against declines in employee self-reported safety compliance and organizational citizenship behaviors compared with employees in the control facilities. The hypothesized mediators of perceptions of family-supportive supervisor behaviors, control over work time, and work-family conflict (work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict) were not significantly improved by the intervention. However, baseline perceptions of family-supportive supervisor behaviors, control over work time, and work-family climate were significant moderators of the intervention effect on the self-reported safety compliance and organizational citizenship behavior outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)190-208
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume101
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

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Family Health
Compliance
Safety
Behavior Control
Facility Regulation and Control
Multilevel Analysis
Family Conflict
Health Facilities
Climate
Delivery of Health Care

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Hammer, L. B., Johnson, R. C., Crain, T. L., Bodner, T., Kossek, E. E., Davis, K. D., ... Berkman, L. (2016). Intervention effects on safety compliance and citizenship behaviors: Evidence from the work, family, and health study. Journal of Applied Psychology, 101(2), 190-208. https://doi.org/10.1037/apl0000047
Hammer, Leslie B. ; Johnson, Ryan C. ; Crain, Tori L. ; Bodner, Todd ; Kossek, Ellen Ernst ; Davis, Kelly D. ; Kelly, Erin L. ; Buxton, Orfeu M. ; Karuntzos, Georgia ; Casey Chosewood, L. ; Berkman, Lisa. / Intervention effects on safety compliance and citizenship behaviors : Evidence from the work, family, and health study. In: Journal of Applied Psychology. 2016 ; Vol. 101, No. 2. pp. 190-208.
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Hammer, LB, Johnson, RC, Crain, TL, Bodner, T, Kossek, EE, Davis, KD, Kelly, EL, Buxton, OM, Karuntzos, G, Casey Chosewood, L & Berkman, L 2016, 'Intervention effects on safety compliance and citizenship behaviors: Evidence from the work, family, and health study', Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 101, no. 2, pp. 190-208. https://doi.org/10.1037/apl0000047

Intervention effects on safety compliance and citizenship behaviors : Evidence from the work, family, and health study. / Hammer, Leslie B.; Johnson, Ryan C.; Crain, Tori L.; Bodner, Todd; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Davis, Kelly D.; Kelly, Erin L.; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Karuntzos, Georgia; Casey Chosewood, L.; Berkman, Lisa.

In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 101, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 190-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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