Intravital microscopy of capillary hemodynamics in sickle cell disease

Herbert Herling Lipowsky, N. U. Sheikh, D. M. Katz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Direct intravital microscopic examinations were made in nailfold capillaries in subjects with homozygous sickle cell disease (HbSS red cells). In the resting state, capillary red cell (rbc) flux exhibited greater intermittence compared with normal subjects, which increased with painful crisis. In crisis-free HbSS subjects, capillary occlusion and red cell sequestration occurred in only 8.2% of all capillaries and diminished to 5.8% during crisis, possibly due to sequestration of less deformable rbcs in other organs. Velocities of rbc's (V(rbc)) were measured by video techniques under resting conditions and during postocclusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) induced by a pressure cuff around the finger. Resting V(rbc) was normal in crisis-free HbSS subjects, averaging 0.7 mm/s. In contrast, V(rbc) was significantly elevated during crisis, to 0.98 mm/s, apparently due to compensatory arteriolar dilation. Crisis subjects exhibited a significantly depressed PORH with the ratio of peak red cell velocity to resting values reduced by 15% due to a loss of vasodilatory reserve, whereas crisis-free subjects exhibited a normal response. A 55% increase in the time to attain peak V(rbc) was attributed to resistance increases, possibly resulting from red cell and leukocyte-to-endothelium adhesion during the induced ischemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-127
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume80
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

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Sickle Cell Anemia
Hemodynamics
Hyperemia
Fingers
Endothelium
Dilatation
Leukocytes
Ischemia
Intravital Microscopy
Pressure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lipowsky, Herbert Herling ; Sheikh, N. U. ; Katz, D. M. / Intravital microscopy of capillary hemodynamics in sickle cell disease. In: Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1987 ; Vol. 80, No. 1. pp. 117-127.
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abstract = "Direct intravital microscopic examinations were made in nailfold capillaries in subjects with homozygous sickle cell disease (HbSS red cells). In the resting state, capillary red cell (rbc) flux exhibited greater intermittence compared with normal subjects, which increased with painful crisis. In crisis-free HbSS subjects, capillary occlusion and red cell sequestration occurred in only 8.2{\%} of all capillaries and diminished to 5.8{\%} during crisis, possibly due to sequestration of less deformable rbcs in other organs. Velocities of rbc's (V(rbc)) were measured by video techniques under resting conditions and during postocclusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) induced by a pressure cuff around the finger. Resting V(rbc) was normal in crisis-free HbSS subjects, averaging 0.7 mm/s. In contrast, V(rbc) was significantly elevated during crisis, to 0.98 mm/s, apparently due to compensatory arteriolar dilation. Crisis subjects exhibited a significantly depressed PORH with the ratio of peak red cell velocity to resting values reduced by 15{\%} due to a loss of vasodilatory reserve, whereas crisis-free subjects exhibited a normal response. A 55{\%} increase in the time to attain peak V(rbc) was attributed to resistance increases, possibly resulting from red cell and leukocyte-to-endothelium adhesion during the induced ischemia.",
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Intravital microscopy of capillary hemodynamics in sickle cell disease. / Lipowsky, Herbert Herling; Sheikh, N. U.; Katz, D. M.

In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 80, No. 1, 01.01.1987, p. 117-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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