Intravitreal injections

Guidelines to minimize the risk of endophthalmitis

Ingrid Scott, Harry W. Flynn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intravitreal injection was reported by Ohm in 1911 as a technique to introduce air for retinal tamponade and repair of retinal detachment [28]. Intravitreal administration of pharmacotherapies dates to the mid-1940s with the use of penicillin to treat endophthalmitis [34, 35]. Since that time, use of the intravitreal injection technique has steadily increased, with its usage being focused primarily on the treatment of retinal detachment [7, 32], endophthalmitis [8, 31], and cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis [13, 43]. The increasing confidence in the efficacy and safety of intravitreal injections, in conjunction with the development of additional pharmacotherapies, has led to a recent rapid increase in the use of this technique for the administration of various pharmacotherapies (e.g., ranibizumab [6], pegaptanib sodium [9, 41, 42]) for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and intravitreal triamcinolone for macular edema associated with a variety of etiologies, such as diabetic retinopathy [21], central retinal vein occlusion [10, 36], branch retinal vein occlusion [5, 17, 30, 37], uveitis [2, 44], and birdshot retinochoroidopathy [22].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRetinal Vascular Disease
PublisherSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
Pages283-288
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9783540295419
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

Fingerprint

Intravitreal Injections
Endophthalmitis
Retinal Vein Occlusion
Retinal Detachment
Guidelines
Drug Therapy
Cytomegalovirus Retinitis
Retinal Vein
Triamcinolone
Macular Edema
Uveitis
Macular Degeneration
Diabetic Retinopathy
Penicillins
Air
Safety
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Scott, I., & Flynn, H. W. (2007). Intravitreal injections: Guidelines to minimize the risk of endophthalmitis. In Retinal Vascular Disease (pp. 283-288). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-29542-6_18
Scott, Ingrid ; Flynn, Harry W. / Intravitreal injections : Guidelines to minimize the risk of endophthalmitis. Retinal Vascular Disease. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2007. pp. 283-288
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Scott, I & Flynn, HW 2007, Intravitreal injections: Guidelines to minimize the risk of endophthalmitis. in Retinal Vascular Disease. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 283-288. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-29542-6_18

Intravitreal injections : Guidelines to minimize the risk of endophthalmitis. / Scott, Ingrid; Flynn, Harry W.

Retinal Vascular Disease. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2007. p. 283-288.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Scott I, Flynn HW. Intravitreal injections: Guidelines to minimize the risk of endophthalmitis. In Retinal Vascular Disease. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. 2007. p. 283-288 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-29542-6_18