Intrinsic Fluctuations and Driven Response of Insect Swarms

Rui Ni, James G. Puckett, Eric R. Dufresne, Nicholas T. Ouellette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Animals of all sizes form groups, as acting together can convey advantages over acting alone; thus, collective animal behavior has been identified as a promising template for designing engineered systems. However, models and observations have focused predominantly on characterizing the overall group morphology, and often focus on highly ordered groups such as bird flocks. We instead study a disorganized aggregation (an insect mating swarm), and compare its natural fluctuations with the group-level response to an external stimulus. We quantify the swarm's frequency-dependent linear response and its spectrum of intrinsic fluctuations, and show that the ratio of these two quantities has a simple scaling with frequency. Our results provide a new way of comparing models of collective behavior with experimental data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number118104
JournalPhysical Review Letters
Volume115
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 10 2015

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insects
animals
birds
stimuli
templates
scaling

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Ni, R., Puckett, J. G., Dufresne, E. R., & Ouellette, N. T. (2015). Intrinsic Fluctuations and Driven Response of Insect Swarms. Physical Review Letters, 115(11), [118104]. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.118104
Ni, Rui ; Puckett, James G. ; Dufresne, Eric R. ; Ouellette, Nicholas T. / Intrinsic Fluctuations and Driven Response of Insect Swarms. In: Physical Review Letters. 2015 ; Vol. 115, No. 11.
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Ni, R, Puckett, JG, Dufresne, ER & Ouellette, NT 2015, 'Intrinsic Fluctuations and Driven Response of Insect Swarms', Physical Review Letters, vol. 115, no. 11, 118104. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.118104

Intrinsic Fluctuations and Driven Response of Insect Swarms. / Ni, Rui; Puckett, James G.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

In: Physical Review Letters, Vol. 115, No. 11, 118104, 10.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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