Introgression in Lake MalaŴi: Increasing the Threat of Human Urogenital Schistosomiasis?

Jay R. Stauffer, Henry Madsen, David Rollinson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For the last 15 years, we have studied the relationships among cichlid snail-eating fishes, intermediate snail-host density, and the prevalence of human infection of Schistosoma haematobium in Lake MalaŴi and concluded that the increase of human infection is correlated with the decrease in snail-eating fishes in the shallow waters of the lake. We postulated that a strain of S. haematobium from other parts of Africa, which was introduced into the Cape Maclear region of Lake MalaŴi by tourists, was compatible with Bulinus nyassanus - which is a close relative of B. truncatus, and interbred with the indigenous strain of S. haematobium, which ultimately produced via introgression a strain that can use both B. globosus and B. nyassanus as intermediate hosts. This actively evolving situation involving intermediate snail-host switching and decline of Trematocranus placodon, a natural cichlid snail predator, will impact on transmission of urogenital schistosomiasis within the local communities and on tourists who visit Lake MalaŴi.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-254
Number of pages4
JournalEcoHealth
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

Fingerprint

Schistosomiasis haematobia
schistosomiasis
Snails
introgression
Lakes
snail
Schistosoma haematobium
lake
Cichlids
cichlid
Fishes
Eating
Bulinus
intermediate host
fish
Infection
shallow water
predator
Water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Stauffer, Jay R. ; Madsen, Henry ; Rollinson, David. / Introgression in Lake MalaŴi : Increasing the Threat of Human Urogenital Schistosomiasis?. In: EcoHealth. 2014 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 251-254.
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Introgression in Lake MalaŴi : Increasing the Threat of Human Urogenital Schistosomiasis? / Stauffer, Jay R.; Madsen, Henry; Rollinson, David.

In: EcoHealth, Vol. 11, No. 2, 06.2014, p. 251-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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