Investigating receptiveness to sensing and inference in the home using sensor proxies

Eun Kyoung Choe, Sunny Consolvo, Jaeyeon Jung, Beverly Harrison, Shwetak N. Patel, Julie A. Kientz

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

In-home sensing and inference systems impose privacy risks and social tensions, which can be substantial barriers for the wide adoption of these systems. To understand what might affect people's perceptions and acceptance of in- home sensing and inference systems, we conducted an empirical study with 22 participants from 11 households. The study included in-lab activities, four weeks using sensor proxies in situ, and exit interviews. We report on participants' perceived benefits and concerns of in-home sensing applications and the observed changes of their perceptions throughout the study. We also report on tensions amongst stakeholders around the adoption and use of such systems. We conclude with a discussion on how the ubicomp design space might be sensitized to people's perceived concerns and tensions regarding sensing and inference in the home.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationUbiComp'12 - Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Conference on Ubiquitous Computing
Pages61-70
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 19 2012
Event14th International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing, UbiComp 2012 - Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Duration: Sep 5 2012Sep 8 2012

Publication series

NameUbiComp'12 - Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Conference on Ubiquitous Computing

Other

Other14th International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing, UbiComp 2012
CountryUnited States
CityPittsburgh, PA
Period9/5/129/8/12

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Software

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