Investigating the impact of self-efficacy in learning disaster strategies in an on-line serious game

Holly Blasko-Drabik, Dawn Blasko, Heather C. Lum, Bilge Erdem, Miri Ohashi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As playing serious games becomes a more viable method of teaching it is important to examine the factors that may impact successful learning. In the current study we examined whether college students could learn disaster prevention strategies from an on-line game. We measured perceptions of learning self-efficacy, enjoyment and game usability. Participants were asked to play an online serious game designed to help them learn what to do to prepare for a natural disaster (tsunami). Knowledge of disaster strategies were measured before and after two brief game periods. The results showed that players significantly improved in their knowledge and performance. The best predictor of post-test scores was the players' perceived self-efficacy at the end of the game. Players who felt that they could master the game, tended to have the highest performance scores. Enjoyment of the game also predicted performance suggesting that those who felt more positively also felt that they could master the game. In this relatively simple game space perceptions of usability were not as strong a predictor of performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013
Pages1455-1459
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 13 2013
Event57th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting - 2013, HFES 2013 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Sep 30 2013Oct 4 2013

Other

Other57th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting - 2013, HFES 2013
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period9/30/1310/4/13

Fingerprint

Disasters
self-efficacy
disaster
learning
Disaster prevention
performance
Tsunamis
method of teaching
Teaching
Students
natural disaster
Serious games
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Blasko-Drabik, H., Blasko, D., Lum, H. C., Erdem, B., & Ohashi, M. (2013). Investigating the impact of self-efficacy in learning disaster strategies in an on-line serious game. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013 (pp. 1455-1459) https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931213571325
Blasko-Drabik, Holly ; Blasko, Dawn ; Lum, Heather C. ; Erdem, Bilge ; Ohashi, Miri. / Investigating the impact of self-efficacy in learning disaster strategies in an on-line serious game. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013. 2013. pp. 1455-1459
@inproceedings{e06af67a23894ac692b468e14c4642b8,
title = "Investigating the impact of self-efficacy in learning disaster strategies in an on-line serious game",
abstract = "As playing serious games becomes a more viable method of teaching it is important to examine the factors that may impact successful learning. In the current study we examined whether college students could learn disaster prevention strategies from an on-line game. We measured perceptions of learning self-efficacy, enjoyment and game usability. Participants were asked to play an online serious game designed to help them learn what to do to prepare for a natural disaster (tsunami). Knowledge of disaster strategies were measured before and after two brief game periods. The results showed that players significantly improved in their knowledge and performance. The best predictor of post-test scores was the players' perceived self-efficacy at the end of the game. Players who felt that they could master the game, tended to have the highest performance scores. Enjoyment of the game also predicted performance suggesting that those who felt more positively also felt that they could master the game. In this relatively simple game space perceptions of usability were not as strong a predictor of performance.",
author = "Holly Blasko-Drabik and Dawn Blasko and Lum, {Heather C.} and Bilge Erdem and Miri Ohashi",
year = "2013",
month = "12",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1177/1541931213571325",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780945289432",
pages = "1455--1459",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013",

}

Blasko-Drabik, H, Blasko, D, Lum, HC, Erdem, B & Ohashi, M 2013, Investigating the impact of self-efficacy in learning disaster strategies in an on-line serious game. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013. pp. 1455-1459, 57th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting - 2013, HFES 2013, San Diego, CA, United States, 9/30/13. https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931213571325

Investigating the impact of self-efficacy in learning disaster strategies in an on-line serious game. / Blasko-Drabik, Holly; Blasko, Dawn; Lum, Heather C.; Erdem, Bilge; Ohashi, Miri.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013. 2013. p. 1455-1459.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Investigating the impact of self-efficacy in learning disaster strategies in an on-line serious game

AU - Blasko-Drabik, Holly

AU - Blasko, Dawn

AU - Lum, Heather C.

AU - Erdem, Bilge

AU - Ohashi, Miri

PY - 2013/12/13

Y1 - 2013/12/13

N2 - As playing serious games becomes a more viable method of teaching it is important to examine the factors that may impact successful learning. In the current study we examined whether college students could learn disaster prevention strategies from an on-line game. We measured perceptions of learning self-efficacy, enjoyment and game usability. Participants were asked to play an online serious game designed to help them learn what to do to prepare for a natural disaster (tsunami). Knowledge of disaster strategies were measured before and after two brief game periods. The results showed that players significantly improved in their knowledge and performance. The best predictor of post-test scores was the players' perceived self-efficacy at the end of the game. Players who felt that they could master the game, tended to have the highest performance scores. Enjoyment of the game also predicted performance suggesting that those who felt more positively also felt that they could master the game. In this relatively simple game space perceptions of usability were not as strong a predictor of performance.

AB - As playing serious games becomes a more viable method of teaching it is important to examine the factors that may impact successful learning. In the current study we examined whether college students could learn disaster prevention strategies from an on-line game. We measured perceptions of learning self-efficacy, enjoyment and game usability. Participants were asked to play an online serious game designed to help them learn what to do to prepare for a natural disaster (tsunami). Knowledge of disaster strategies were measured before and after two brief game periods. The results showed that players significantly improved in their knowledge and performance. The best predictor of post-test scores was the players' perceived self-efficacy at the end of the game. Players who felt that they could master the game, tended to have the highest performance scores. Enjoyment of the game also predicted performance suggesting that those who felt more positively also felt that they could master the game. In this relatively simple game space perceptions of usability were not as strong a predictor of performance.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84889783966&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84889783966&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1541931213571325

DO - 10.1177/1541931213571325

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9780945289432

SP - 1455

EP - 1459

BT - Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013

ER -

Blasko-Drabik H, Blasko D, Lum HC, Erdem B, Ohashi M. Investigating the impact of self-efficacy in learning disaster strategies in an on-line serious game. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013. 2013. p. 1455-1459 https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931213571325