Investigation of index finger triggering force using a cadaver experiment: Effects of trigger grip span, contact location, and internal tendon force

Joonho Chang, Andris Freivalds, Neil Sharkey, Yong Ku Kong, Hyun-Min Mike Kim, Kiseok Sung, Dae Min Kim, Kihyo Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A cadaver study was conducted to investigate the effects of triggering conditions (trigger grip span, contact location, and internal tendon force) on index finger triggering force and the force efficiency of involved tendons. Eight right human cadaveric hands were employed, and a motion simulator was built to secure and control the specimens. Index finger triggering forces were investigated as a function of different internal tendon forces (flexor digitorum profundus + flexor digitorum superficialis = 40, 70, and 100 N), trigger grip spans (40, 50, and 60 mm), and contact locations between the index finger and a trigger. Triggering forces significantly increased when internal tendon forces increased from 40 to 100 N. Also, trigger grip spans and contact locations had significant effects on triggering forces; maximum triggering forces were found at a 50 mm span and the most proximal contact location. The results revealed that only 10–30% of internal tendon forces were converted to their external triggering forces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-190
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Ergonomics
Volume65
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

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Tendons
Hand Strength
Cadaver
Fingers
contact
experiment
Experiments
human rights
efficiency
Hand
Simulators

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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title = "Investigation of index finger triggering force using a cadaver experiment: Effects of trigger grip span, contact location, and internal tendon force",
abstract = "A cadaver study was conducted to investigate the effects of triggering conditions (trigger grip span, contact location, and internal tendon force) on index finger triggering force and the force efficiency of involved tendons. Eight right human cadaveric hands were employed, and a motion simulator was built to secure and control the specimens. Index finger triggering forces were investigated as a function of different internal tendon forces (flexor digitorum profundus + flexor digitorum superficialis = 40, 70, and 100 N), trigger grip spans (40, 50, and 60 mm), and contact locations between the index finger and a trigger. Triggering forces significantly increased when internal tendon forces increased from 40 to 100 N. Also, trigger grip spans and contact locations had significant effects on triggering forces; maximum triggering forces were found at a 50 mm span and the most proximal contact location. The results revealed that only 10–30{\%} of internal tendon forces were converted to their external triggering forces.",
author = "Joonho Chang and Andris Freivalds and Neil Sharkey and Kong, {Yong Ku} and Kim, {Hyun-Min Mike} and Kiseok Sung and Kim, {Dae Min} and Kihyo Jung",
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Investigation of index finger triggering force using a cadaver experiment : Effects of trigger grip span, contact location, and internal tendon force. / Chang, Joonho; Freivalds, Andris; Sharkey, Neil; Kong, Yong Ku; Kim, Hyun-Min Mike; Sung, Kiseok; Kim, Dae Min; Jung, Kihyo.

In: Applied Ergonomics, Vol. 65, 01.11.2017, p. 183-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

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AU - Chang, Joonho

AU - Freivalds, Andris

AU - Sharkey, Neil

AU - Kong, Yong Ku

AU - Kim, Hyun-Min Mike

AU - Sung, Kiseok

AU - Kim, Dae Min

AU - Jung, Kihyo

PY - 2017/11/1

Y1 - 2017/11/1

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