Involuntary smoking and head and neck cancer risk

Pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium

Yuan Chin Amy Lee, Paolo Boffetta, Erich M. Sturgis, Qingyi Wei, Zuo Feng Zhang, Joshua Muscat, Philip Lazarus, Elena Matos, Richard B. Hayes, Deborah M. Winn, David Zaridze, Victor Wünsch-Filho, Jose Eluf-Neto, Sergio Koifman, Dana Mates, Maria Paula Curado, Ana Menezes, Leticia Fernandez, Alexander W. Daudt, Neonila Szeszenia-Dabrowska & 6 others Eleonora Fabianova, Peter Rudnai, Gilles Ferro, Julien Berthiller, Paul Brennan, Mia Hashibe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Although active tobacco smoking has been identified as a major risk factor for head and neck cancer, involuntary smoking has not been adequately evaluated because of the relatively low statistical power in previous studies. We took advantage of data pooled in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium to evaluate the role of involuntary smoking in head and neck carcinogenesis. Involuntary smoking exposure data were pooled across six case-control studies in Central Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were estimated for 542 cases and 2,197 controls who reported never using tobacco, and the heterogeneity among the study-specific ORs was assessed. In addition, stratified analyses were done by subsite. No effect of ever involuntary smoking exposure either at home or at work was observed for head and neck cancer overall. However, long duration of involuntary smoking exposure at home and at work was associated with an increased risk (OR for >15 years at home, 1.60; 95%CI, 1.12-2.28; Ptrend < 0.01; OR for >15 years at work, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.04-2.30; Ptrend = 0.13). The effect of duration of involuntary smoking exposure at home was stronger for pharyngeal and laryngeal cancers than for other subsites. An association between involuntary smoking exposure and the risk of head and neck cancer, particularly pharyngeal and laryngeal cancers, was observed for long duration of exposure. These results are consistent with those for active smoking and suggest that elimination of involuntary smoking exposure might reduce head and neck cancer risk among never smokers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1974-1981
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume17
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

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Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Epidemiology
Pharyngeal Neoplasms
Laryngeal Neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Smoking
Confidence Intervals
Latin America
Tobacco
Case-Control Studies
Carcinogenesis
Neck
Head

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Lee, Yuan Chin Amy ; Boffetta, Paolo ; Sturgis, Erich M. ; Wei, Qingyi ; Zhang, Zuo Feng ; Muscat, Joshua ; Lazarus, Philip ; Matos, Elena ; Hayes, Richard B. ; Winn, Deborah M. ; Zaridze, David ; Wünsch-Filho, Victor ; Eluf-Neto, Jose ; Koifman, Sergio ; Mates, Dana ; Curado, Maria Paula ; Menezes, Ana ; Fernandez, Leticia ; Daudt, Alexander W. ; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila ; Fabianova, Eleonora ; Rudnai, Peter ; Ferro, Gilles ; Berthiller, Julien ; Brennan, Paul ; Hashibe, Mia. / Involuntary smoking and head and neck cancer risk : Pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2008 ; Vol. 17, No. 8. pp. 1974-1981.
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abstract = "Although active tobacco smoking has been identified as a major risk factor for head and neck cancer, involuntary smoking has not been adequately evaluated because of the relatively low statistical power in previous studies. We took advantage of data pooled in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium to evaluate the role of involuntary smoking in head and neck carcinogenesis. Involuntary smoking exposure data were pooled across six case-control studies in Central Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95{\%} confidence interval (95{\%} CI) were estimated for 542 cases and 2,197 controls who reported never using tobacco, and the heterogeneity among the study-specific ORs was assessed. In addition, stratified analyses were done by subsite. No effect of ever involuntary smoking exposure either at home or at work was observed for head and neck cancer overall. However, long duration of involuntary smoking exposure at home and at work was associated with an increased risk (OR for >15 years at home, 1.60; 95{\%}CI, 1.12-2.28; Ptrend < 0.01; OR for >15 years at work, 1.55; 95{\%} CI, 1.04-2.30; Ptrend = 0.13). The effect of duration of involuntary smoking exposure at home was stronger for pharyngeal and laryngeal cancers than for other subsites. An association between involuntary smoking exposure and the risk of head and neck cancer, particularly pharyngeal and laryngeal cancers, was observed for long duration of exposure. These results are consistent with those for active smoking and suggest that elimination of involuntary smoking exposure might reduce head and neck cancer risk among never smokers.",
author = "Lee, {Yuan Chin Amy} and Paolo Boffetta and Sturgis, {Erich M.} and Qingyi Wei and Zhang, {Zuo Feng} and Joshua Muscat and Philip Lazarus and Elena Matos and Hayes, {Richard B.} and Winn, {Deborah M.} and David Zaridze and Victor W{\"u}nsch-Filho and Jose Eluf-Neto and Sergio Koifman and Dana Mates and Curado, {Maria Paula} and Ana Menezes and Leticia Fernandez and Daudt, {Alexander W.} and Neonila Szeszenia-Dabrowska and Eleonora Fabianova and Peter Rudnai and Gilles Ferro and Julien Berthiller and Paul Brennan and Mia Hashibe",
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Lee, YCA, Boffetta, P, Sturgis, EM, Wei, Q, Zhang, ZF, Muscat, J, Lazarus, P, Matos, E, Hayes, RB, Winn, DM, Zaridze, D, Wünsch-Filho, V, Eluf-Neto, J, Koifman, S, Mates, D, Curado, MP, Menezes, A, Fernandez, L, Daudt, AW, Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N, Fabianova, E, Rudnai, P, Ferro, G, Berthiller, J, Brennan, P & Hashibe, M 2008, 'Involuntary smoking and head and neck cancer risk: Pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 17, no. 8, pp. 1974-1981. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0047

Involuntary smoking and head and neck cancer risk : Pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium. / Lee, Yuan Chin Amy; Boffetta, Paolo; Sturgis, Erich M.; Wei, Qingyi; Zhang, Zuo Feng; Muscat, Joshua; Lazarus, Philip; Matos, Elena; Hayes, Richard B.; Winn, Deborah M.; Zaridze, David; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Eluf-Neto, Jose; Koifman, Sergio; Mates, Dana; Curado, Maria Paula; Menezes, Ana; Fernandez, Leticia; Daudt, Alexander W.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Fabianova, Eleonora; Rudnai, Peter; Ferro, Gilles; Berthiller, Julien; Brennan, Paul; Hashibe, Mia.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 17, No. 8, 01.01.2008, p. 1974-1981.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Involuntary smoking and head and neck cancer risk

T2 - Pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium

AU - Lee, Yuan Chin Amy

AU - Boffetta, Paolo

AU - Sturgis, Erich M.

AU - Wei, Qingyi

AU - Zhang, Zuo Feng

AU - Muscat, Joshua

AU - Lazarus, Philip

AU - Matos, Elena

AU - Hayes, Richard B.

AU - Winn, Deborah M.

AU - Zaridze, David

AU - Wünsch-Filho, Victor

AU - Eluf-Neto, Jose

AU - Koifman, Sergio

AU - Mates, Dana

AU - Curado, Maria Paula

AU - Menezes, Ana

AU - Fernandez, Leticia

AU - Daudt, Alexander W.

AU - Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila

AU - Fabianova, Eleonora

AU - Rudnai, Peter

AU - Ferro, Gilles

AU - Berthiller, Julien

AU - Brennan, Paul

AU - Hashibe, Mia

PY - 2008/1/1

Y1 - 2008/1/1

N2 - Although active tobacco smoking has been identified as a major risk factor for head and neck cancer, involuntary smoking has not been adequately evaluated because of the relatively low statistical power in previous studies. We took advantage of data pooled in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium to evaluate the role of involuntary smoking in head and neck carcinogenesis. Involuntary smoking exposure data were pooled across six case-control studies in Central Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were estimated for 542 cases and 2,197 controls who reported never using tobacco, and the heterogeneity among the study-specific ORs was assessed. In addition, stratified analyses were done by subsite. No effect of ever involuntary smoking exposure either at home or at work was observed for head and neck cancer overall. However, long duration of involuntary smoking exposure at home and at work was associated with an increased risk (OR for >15 years at home, 1.60; 95%CI, 1.12-2.28; Ptrend < 0.01; OR for >15 years at work, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.04-2.30; Ptrend = 0.13). The effect of duration of involuntary smoking exposure at home was stronger for pharyngeal and laryngeal cancers than for other subsites. An association between involuntary smoking exposure and the risk of head and neck cancer, particularly pharyngeal and laryngeal cancers, was observed for long duration of exposure. These results are consistent with those for active smoking and suggest that elimination of involuntary smoking exposure might reduce head and neck cancer risk among never smokers.

AB - Although active tobacco smoking has been identified as a major risk factor for head and neck cancer, involuntary smoking has not been adequately evaluated because of the relatively low statistical power in previous studies. We took advantage of data pooled in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium to evaluate the role of involuntary smoking in head and neck carcinogenesis. Involuntary smoking exposure data were pooled across six case-control studies in Central Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were estimated for 542 cases and 2,197 controls who reported never using tobacco, and the heterogeneity among the study-specific ORs was assessed. In addition, stratified analyses were done by subsite. No effect of ever involuntary smoking exposure either at home or at work was observed for head and neck cancer overall. However, long duration of involuntary smoking exposure at home and at work was associated with an increased risk (OR for >15 years at home, 1.60; 95%CI, 1.12-2.28; Ptrend < 0.01; OR for >15 years at work, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.04-2.30; Ptrend = 0.13). The effect of duration of involuntary smoking exposure at home was stronger for pharyngeal and laryngeal cancers than for other subsites. An association between involuntary smoking exposure and the risk of head and neck cancer, particularly pharyngeal and laryngeal cancers, was observed for long duration of exposure. These results are consistent with those for active smoking and suggest that elimination of involuntary smoking exposure might reduce head and neck cancer risk among never smokers.

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U2 - 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0047

DO - 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0047

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VL - 17

SP - 1974

EP - 1981

JO - Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

JF - Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

SN - 1055-9965

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