Iron and Zinc Supplementation Does Not Impact Urinary Arsenic Excretion in Mexican School Children

Katarzyna Kordas, Aditi Roy, Patricia López, Gonzalo García-Vargas, Mariano E. Cebrián, Eunice Vera-Aguilar, Jorge L. Rosado

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To examine the role of iron and zinc in arsenic excretion and metabolism in children. Study design An analysis of urinary arsenic (UAs) concentrations from a double-blind randomized trial originally testing the efficacy of iron and zinc for lowering blood lead levels in children. A 2 × 2 factorial design was used, with children randomized individually, stratified by sex and classroom, to receive 30 mg ferrous fumarate (n = 148), 30 mg zinc oxide (n = 144), iron and zinc together (n = 148), or placebo (n = 151). Of the 602 children enrolled, 527 completed the 6-month treatment, and 485 had both baseline and final UAs values. The baseline total UAs concentration ranged from 3.2 to 215.9 µg/L. Results At baseline, children in the highest tertile of serum ferritin concentration had higher excretion of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA; 1.93 ± 0.86%; P <.05), but lower excretion of monomethylarsonic acid (-0.91 ± 0.39%; P <.05), compared with children in the lowest tertile. In an intention-to-treat analysis, iron had no effect on arsenic methylation or UAs excretion, but children receiving zinc had lower %DMA in urine (-1.7 ± 0.8; P <.05). Conclusions Iron and zinc status are not related to arsenic metabolism in children, and supplementation with these minerals has limited application in lowering arsenic concentrations. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02346188.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-210.e1
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume185
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2017

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Arsenic
Zinc
Iron
Cacodylic Acid
Zinc Oxide
Intention to Treat Analysis
Ferritins
Methylation
Minerals
Placebos
Urine
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Kordas, K., Roy, A., López, P., García-Vargas, G., Cebrián, M. E., Vera-Aguilar, E., & Rosado, J. L. (2017). Iron and Zinc Supplementation Does Not Impact Urinary Arsenic Excretion in Mexican School Children. Journal of Pediatrics, 185, 205-210.e1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.02.040
Kordas, Katarzyna ; Roy, Aditi ; López, Patricia ; García-Vargas, Gonzalo ; Cebrián, Mariano E. ; Vera-Aguilar, Eunice ; Rosado, Jorge L. / Iron and Zinc Supplementation Does Not Impact Urinary Arsenic Excretion in Mexican School Children. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2017 ; Vol. 185. pp. 205-210.e1.
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abstract = "Objective To examine the role of iron and zinc in arsenic excretion and metabolism in children. Study design An analysis of urinary arsenic (UAs) concentrations from a double-blind randomized trial originally testing the efficacy of iron and zinc for lowering blood lead levels in children. A 2 × 2 factorial design was used, with children randomized individually, stratified by sex and classroom, to receive 30 mg ferrous fumarate (n = 148), 30 mg zinc oxide (n = 144), iron and zinc together (n = 148), or placebo (n = 151). Of the 602 children enrolled, 527 completed the 6-month treatment, and 485 had both baseline and final UAs values. The baseline total UAs concentration ranged from 3.2 to 215.9 µg/L. Results At baseline, children in the highest tertile of serum ferritin concentration had higher excretion of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA; 1.93 ± 0.86{\%}; P <.05), but lower excretion of monomethylarsonic acid (-0.91 ± 0.39{\%}; P <.05), compared with children in the lowest tertile. In an intention-to-treat analysis, iron had no effect on arsenic methylation or UAs excretion, but children receiving zinc had lower {\%}DMA in urine (-1.7 ± 0.8; P <.05). Conclusions Iron and zinc status are not related to arsenic metabolism in children, and supplementation with these minerals has limited application in lowering arsenic concentrations. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02346188.",
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Kordas, K, Roy, A, López, P, García-Vargas, G, Cebrián, ME, Vera-Aguilar, E & Rosado, JL 2017, 'Iron and Zinc Supplementation Does Not Impact Urinary Arsenic Excretion in Mexican School Children', Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 185, pp. 205-210.e1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.02.040

Iron and Zinc Supplementation Does Not Impact Urinary Arsenic Excretion in Mexican School Children. / Kordas, Katarzyna; Roy, Aditi; López, Patricia; García-Vargas, Gonzalo; Cebrián, Mariano E.; Vera-Aguilar, Eunice; Rosado, Jorge L.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 185, 06.2017, p. 205-210.e1.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Iron and Zinc Supplementation Does Not Impact Urinary Arsenic Excretion in Mexican School Children

AU - Kordas, Katarzyna

AU - Roy, Aditi

AU - López, Patricia

AU - García-Vargas, Gonzalo

AU - Cebrián, Mariano E.

AU - Vera-Aguilar, Eunice

AU - Rosado, Jorge L.

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Y1 - 2017/6

N2 - Objective To examine the role of iron and zinc in arsenic excretion and metabolism in children. Study design An analysis of urinary arsenic (UAs) concentrations from a double-blind randomized trial originally testing the efficacy of iron and zinc for lowering blood lead levels in children. A 2 × 2 factorial design was used, with children randomized individually, stratified by sex and classroom, to receive 30 mg ferrous fumarate (n = 148), 30 mg zinc oxide (n = 144), iron and zinc together (n = 148), or placebo (n = 151). Of the 602 children enrolled, 527 completed the 6-month treatment, and 485 had both baseline and final UAs values. The baseline total UAs concentration ranged from 3.2 to 215.9 µg/L. Results At baseline, children in the highest tertile of serum ferritin concentration had higher excretion of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA; 1.93 ± 0.86%; P <.05), but lower excretion of monomethylarsonic acid (-0.91 ± 0.39%; P <.05), compared with children in the lowest tertile. In an intention-to-treat analysis, iron had no effect on arsenic methylation or UAs excretion, but children receiving zinc had lower %DMA in urine (-1.7 ± 0.8; P <.05). Conclusions Iron and zinc status are not related to arsenic metabolism in children, and supplementation with these minerals has limited application in lowering arsenic concentrations. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02346188.

AB - Objective To examine the role of iron and zinc in arsenic excretion and metabolism in children. Study design An analysis of urinary arsenic (UAs) concentrations from a double-blind randomized trial originally testing the efficacy of iron and zinc for lowering blood lead levels in children. A 2 × 2 factorial design was used, with children randomized individually, stratified by sex and classroom, to receive 30 mg ferrous fumarate (n = 148), 30 mg zinc oxide (n = 144), iron and zinc together (n = 148), or placebo (n = 151). Of the 602 children enrolled, 527 completed the 6-month treatment, and 485 had both baseline and final UAs values. The baseline total UAs concentration ranged from 3.2 to 215.9 µg/L. Results At baseline, children in the highest tertile of serum ferritin concentration had higher excretion of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA; 1.93 ± 0.86%; P <.05), but lower excretion of monomethylarsonic acid (-0.91 ± 0.39%; P <.05), compared with children in the lowest tertile. In an intention-to-treat analysis, iron had no effect on arsenic methylation or UAs excretion, but children receiving zinc had lower %DMA in urine (-1.7 ± 0.8; P <.05). Conclusions Iron and zinc status are not related to arsenic metabolism in children, and supplementation with these minerals has limited application in lowering arsenic concentrations. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02346188.

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Kordas K, Roy A, López P, García-Vargas G, Cebrián ME, Vera-Aguilar E et al. Iron and Zinc Supplementation Does Not Impact Urinary Arsenic Excretion in Mexican School Children. Journal of Pediatrics. 2017 Jun;185:205-210.e1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.02.040