Abstract

Iron is an essential element for human development. It is a major requirement for cellular processes such as oxygen transport, energy metabolism, neurotransmitter synthesis, and myelin synthesis. Despite its crucial role in these processes, iron in the ferric form can also produce toxic reactive oxygen species. The duality of iron’s function highlights the importance of maintaining a strict balance of iron levels in the body. As a result, organisms have developed elegant mechanisms of iron uptake, transport, and storage. This review will focus on the mechanisms that have evolved at physiological barriers, such as the intestine, the placenta, and the blood–brain barrier (BBB), where iron must be transported. Much has been written about the processes for iron transport across the intestine and the placenta, but less is known about iron transport mechanisms at the BBB. In this review, we compare the established pathways at the intestine and the placenta as well as describe what is currently known about iron transport at the BBB and how brain iron uptake correlates with processes at these other physiological barriers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)573-591
Number of pages19
JournalBioMetals
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

Fingerprint

physiological transport
Iron
iron
uptake mechanisms
blood-brain barrier
Placenta
Intestines
placenta
intestines
Poisons
Human Development
Oxygen
synthesis
human development
Myelin Sheath
myelin sheath
Energy Metabolism
neurotransmitters
Neurotransmitter Agents
Reactive Oxygen Species

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomaterials
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Metals and Alloys

Cite this

Duck, Kari A. ; Connor, James R. / Iron uptake and transport across physiological barriers. In: BioMetals. 2016 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 573-591.
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Iron uptake and transport across physiological barriers. / Duck, Kari A.; Connor, James R.

In: BioMetals, Vol. 29, No. 4, 01.08.2016, p. 573-591.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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