Irradiated interplanetary dust particles as a possible solution for the deuterium/hydrogen paradox of Earth's oceans

Alexander A. Pavlov, Anatoli K. Pavlov, James Kasting

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Determining the source of Earth's oceans is a longstanding problem in planetary science. Possible sources of water include water ice or water of hydration of silicate minerals in the original material from which the bulk Earth accreted and water brought in by late-arriving planetesimals during the heavy bombardment period (4.5-3.8 Gyr ago) [Chyba, 1989, 1991]. Comets are an attractive source of water because their origin in the outer solar system is consistent with the long timescale for heavy bombardment. However, the high deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratio of the three comets that have been studied, Halley, Hyakutake, and Hale-Bopp, indicates that Earth must have had a source with a low-D/H ratio as well. Here we suggest that solar wind-implanted hydrogen on interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) provided the necessary low-D/H component of Earth's water inventory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1999JE001120
Pages (from-to)30725-30728
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research E: Planets
Volume104
Issue numberE12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 25 1999

Fingerprint

interplanetary dust
deuterium
Deuterium
paradoxes
dust
Particles (particulate matter)
hydrogen
Dust
Hydrogen
oceans
Earth (planet)
Water
ocean
water
comets
comet
bombardment
Silicate minerals
silicate minerals
Hale-Bopp

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Forestry
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Materials Chemistry
  • Palaeontology

Cite this

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abstract = "Determining the source of Earth's oceans is a longstanding problem in planetary science. Possible sources of water include water ice or water of hydration of silicate minerals in the original material from which the bulk Earth accreted and water brought in by late-arriving planetesimals during the heavy bombardment period (4.5-3.8 Gyr ago) [Chyba, 1989, 1991]. Comets are an attractive source of water because their origin in the outer solar system is consistent with the long timescale for heavy bombardment. However, the high deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratio of the three comets that have been studied, Halley, Hyakutake, and Hale-Bopp, indicates that Earth must have had a source with a low-D/H ratio as well. Here we suggest that solar wind-implanted hydrogen on interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) provided the necessary low-D/H component of Earth's water inventory.",
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Irradiated interplanetary dust particles as a possible solution for the deuterium/hydrogen paradox of Earth's oceans. / Pavlov, Alexander A.; Pavlov, Anatoli K.; Kasting, James.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets, Vol. 104, No. E12, 1999JE001120, 25.12.1999, p. 30725-30728.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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