Irritability and Limited Prosocial Emotions/Callous-Unemotional Traits in Elementary-School-Age Children

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Affective traits, including irritability and limited prosocial emotions/callous-unemotional traits (LPE/CU), each explain significant variance in youth conduct problems but few studies have examined these constructs simultaneously. This study examined whether irritability, LPE/CU, or their combination explained significant variance in measures of internalizing or externalizing psychopathology, aggression, peer problems, impairment, or parenting. Participants were 219 elementary-school-age children, including 178 with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and/or conduct disorder and 41 typically developing children. Results of analyses showed that irritability and LPE/CU had significant and sometimes unique associations with measures of child behavior, impairment, and parenting. There was also evidence that the interaction between irritability and LPE/CU was significantly associated with aggression and impairment. These findings suggest that irritability and LPE/CU should be examined together when assessing and treating conduct problems in youth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBehavior Therapy
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Emotions
Parenting
Aggression
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
Conduct Disorder
Child Behavior
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Psychopathology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

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title = "Irritability and Limited Prosocial Emotions/Callous-Unemotional Traits in Elementary-School-Age Children",
abstract = "Affective traits, including irritability and limited prosocial emotions/callous-unemotional traits (LPE/CU), each explain significant variance in youth conduct problems but few studies have examined these constructs simultaneously. This study examined whether irritability, LPE/CU, or their combination explained significant variance in measures of internalizing or externalizing psychopathology, aggression, peer problems, impairment, or parenting. Participants were 219 elementary-school-age children, including 178 with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and/or conduct disorder and 41 typically developing children. Results of analyses showed that irritability and LPE/CU had significant and sometimes unique associations with measures of child behavior, impairment, and parenting. There was also evidence that the interaction between irritability and LPE/CU was significantly associated with aggression and impairment. These findings suggest that irritability and LPE/CU should be examined together when assessing and treating conduct problems in youth.",
author = "Daniel Waschbusch and Raman Baweja and Dara Babinski and Susan Mayes and James Waxmonsky",
year = "2019",
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AU - Waschbusch, Daniel

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AU - Babinski, Dara

AU - Mayes, Susan

AU - Waxmonsky, James

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