Is Motherhood Important? Imprisoned Women's Maternal Experiences Before and During Confinement and Their Postrelease Expectations

Sandra L. Barnes, Ebonie Cunningham Stringer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

In recent years, sharp increases in the female prison population have landed more mothers behind bars. While the experiences of imprisoned women may differ substantially from free mothers, studies suggest that motherhood is important for many imprisoned mothers. The current study uses a sample of 210 imprisoned mothers and multivariate modeling to investigate how familial relationships before and during imprisonment and mothers' postrelease expectations influence the salience of maternal identity. Findings suggest that regardless of demographic factors, close mother-caregiver relationships, contact with family during imprisonment, and expecting to have custody of children upon release positively impacts imprisoned women's mothering identities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-23
Number of pages21
Journalfeminist criminology
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies
  • Law

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