Is Obama's win a gain for blacks? Changes in implicit racial prejudice following the 2008 election

Michael Jason Bernstein, Steven G. Young, Heather M. Claypool

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Many have questioned what Barack Obama's victory in the 2008 presidential election means for prejudice and intergroup relations in the United States. In this study, we examined both explicit and implicit prejudice toward African Americans prior to and immediately following the election of the first African American to the nation's highest office. Results indicated that implicit prejudice (as measured by an IAT) decreased following Obama's victory, though explicit prejudice remained unchanged. The results are discussed in terms of the malleability of implicit attitudes, race relations, and the impact an Obama presidency and other positive exemplars may have on intergroup relations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-151
Number of pages5
JournalSocial Psychology
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 27 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Psychology(all)

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