Is There a "Party" in your genes?

Peter K. Hatemi, John R. Alford, John R. Hibbing, Nicholas G. Martin, Lindon J. Eaves

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

96 Scopus citations

Abstract

Utilizing quantitative genetic models, the authors examine the sources of party identification and the intensity of that identification. The results indicate genes exert little, if any, influence on party identification, directly or indirectly through covariates. However, we find that genes appear to play a pivotal role in shaping the strength of an individual's party identification. Together with recent examinations of political attitudes and vote choice, these findings begin to provide a more complete picture of the source of partisanship and the complex nature of the political phenotype.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)584-600
Number of pages17
JournalPolitical Research Quarterly
Volume62
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

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    Hatemi, P. K., Alford, J. R., Hibbing, J. R., Martin, N. G., & Eaves, L. J. (2009). Is There a "Party" in your genes? Political Research Quarterly, 62(3), 584-600. https://doi.org/10.1177/1065912908327606