Is there a place for undergraduate and graduate students in the systematic review process?

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Systematic reviews are a well-established and well-honed research methodology in the medical and health sciences fields. As the popularity of systematic reviews has increased, disciplines outside the sciences have started publishing them. This increase in familiarity has begun to trickle down from practitioners and faculty to graduate students and recently undergraduates. The amount of work and rigor that goes into producing a quality systematic review may make these types of research projects seem unattainable for undergraduate or graduate students, but is this an accurate assumption? This commentary discusses whether there is a place for undergraduate and graduate students in the systematic review process. It explains the possible benefits of having undergraduate and graduate students engage in systematic reviews and concludes with ideas for creating basic education or training opportunities for researchers and students who are new to the systematic review process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-250
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the Medical Library Association
Volume106
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2018

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Informatics
  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

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title = "Is there a place for undergraduate and graduate students in the systematic review process?",
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Is there a place for undergraduate and graduate students in the systematic review process? / Wissinger, Christina L.

In: Journal of the Medical Library Association, Vol. 106, No. 2, 04.2018, p. 248-250.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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