Is watching others self-disclose enjoyable? An examination of the effects of information delivery in entertainment media

Mina Tsay-Vogel, Mary Beth Oliver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Self-disclosure is a means through which closeness, familiarity, and satisfaction are produced between partners. The present study integrated interpersonal and mass communication literature to theoretically inform the outcomes of mediated forms of self-disclosure between a viewer and character on television. Empirically testing the effects of two dimensions of disclosure - depth (low intimacy versus high intimacy) and mode (character-to-viewer versus character-to-character versus narrator-to-viewer) of information delivery - this research supported the prediction that a viewer's overall enjoyment of witnessing a character self-disclose personal information would be mediated by identification and transportation. The results suggest the meaningful role of ''character address'' in heightening audience engagement with both the character and narrative. Implications for the similarity of interpersonal and mediated relationships, effective entertainment formats, social reality perceptions, and online self-disclosure are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-124
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Media Psychology
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Communication
  • Applied Psychology

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