Isolation of CD133+ liver stem cells for clonal expansion

C. Bart Rountree, Wei Ding, Hein Dang, Colleen van Kirk, Gay M. Crooks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Liver stem cell, or oval cells, proliferate during chronic liver injury, and are proposed to differentiate into both hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. In addition, liver stem cells are hypothesized to be the precursors for a subset of liver cancer, Hepatocellular carcinoma. One of the primary challenges to stem cell work in any solid organ like the liver is the isolation of a rare population of cells for detailed analysis. For example, the vast majority of cells in the liver are hepatocytes (parenchymal fraction), which are significantly larger than non-parenchymal cells. By enriching the specific cellular compartments of the liver (i.e. parenchymal and non-parenchymal fractions), and selecting for CD45 negative cells, we are able to enrich the starting population of stem cells by over 600-fold.The procedures detailed in this report allow for a relatively rare population of cells from a solid organ to be sorted efficiently. This process can be utilized to isolate liver stem cells from normal murine liver as well as chronic liver injury models, which demonstrate increased liver stem cell proliferation. This method has clear advantages over standard immunohistochemistry of frozen or formalin fixed liver as functional studies using live cells can be performed after initial co-localization experiments. To accomplish the procedure outlined in this report, a working relationship with a research based flow-cytometry core is strongly encouraged as the details of FACS isolation are highly dependent on specialized instrumentation and a strong working knowledge of basic flow-cytometry procedures. The specific goal of this process is to isolate a population of liver stem cells that can be clonally expanded in vitro.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere3183
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Issue number56
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

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Stem cells
Liver
Stem Cells
Flow cytometry
Population
Hepatocytes
Flow Cytometry
Cells
Wounds and Injuries
Liver Neoplasms
Cell proliferation
Formaldehyde
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Immunohistochemistry
Cell Proliferation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Bart Rountree, C., Ding, W., Dang, H., van Kirk, C., & Crooks, G. M. (2011). Isolation of CD133+ liver stem cells for clonal expansion. Journal of Visualized Experiments, (56), [e3183]. https://doi.org/10.3791/3183
Bart Rountree, C. ; Ding, Wei ; Dang, Hein ; van Kirk, Colleen ; Crooks, Gay M. / Isolation of CD133+ liver stem cells for clonal expansion. In: Journal of Visualized Experiments. 2011 ; No. 56.
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Isolation of CD133+ liver stem cells for clonal expansion. / Bart Rountree, C.; Ding, Wei; Dang, Hein; van Kirk, Colleen; Crooks, Gay M.

In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, No. 56, e3183, 10.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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