It can be done: An example of a behavioral individualized education program (IEP) for a child with autism

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With state agencies and scientists recommending Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention (EIBI) for children with autism, the demand for qualified behavior consultants exceeds the supply. Consequently, children with autism are either receiving alternative, ineffective, and unsubstantiated treatments or are receiving EIBI programming from unqualified personnel. Additionally, when school districts are approached to provide services, the resulting Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) are typically not behavioral and lack the detailed and specific objectives required for children with autism. This article was written to provide parents and educators with an objective and quantifiable IEP, which has been used as a guideline for treatment for a 4-year-old boy with autism. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-300
Number of pages22
JournalBehavioral Interventions
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000

Fingerprint

Autistic Disorder
Education
Consultants
Parents
Guidelines
Autism
Education Program
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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abstract = "With state agencies and scientists recommending Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention (EIBI) for children with autism, the demand for qualified behavior consultants exceeds the supply. Consequently, children with autism are either receiving alternative, ineffective, and unsubstantiated treatments or are receiving EIBI programming from unqualified personnel. Additionally, when school districts are approached to provide services, the resulting Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) are typically not behavioral and lack the detailed and specific objectives required for children with autism. This article was written to provide parents and educators with an objective and quantifiable IEP, which has been used as a guideline for treatment for a 4-year-old boy with autism. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.",
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It can be done : An example of a behavioral individualized education program (IEP) for a child with autism. / Schreck, Kimberly Anne.

In: Behavioral Interventions, Vol. 15, No. 4, 01.12.2000, p. 279-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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