It's not all black and white: A propensity score matched, multilevel examination of racial drug sentencing disparities

Richard J. Stringer, Melanie Marie Holland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aims to alleviate some of the mixed findings throughout the literature on racial disparities in sentencing outcomes by utilizing propensity score matching and multilevel modeling to assess racial drug sentencing disparities in state courts from 2000–2012. The findings illustrate the effect of race on sentencing varies significantly across states, and aggregate factors impact this relationship. Specifically, although differential offending, minority population, and arrests do not alleviate disparities, they are moderators that explain variance across states. Finally, aggregate socioeconomic factors such as poverty and education are also significant moderators that indicate the importance of structural disadvantage in sentencing outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-347
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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moderator
drug
examination
socioeconomic factors
minority
poverty
education
literature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anthropology
  • Law

Cite this

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It's not all black and white : A propensity score matched, multilevel examination of racial drug sentencing disparities. / Stringer, Richard J.; Holland, Melanie Marie.

In: Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice, Vol. 14, No. 4, 01.10.2016, p. 327-347.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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