JCL Roundtable: Fast food and the American diet

W. Virgil Brown, Jo Ann S. Carson, Rachel K. Johnson, Penny Margaret Kris-Etherton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The availability of food quickly prepared at lower cost and with consistent quality and convenience has made a variety of restaurant chains extremely popular. Commonly referred to as the fast food industry, these companies have stores on virtually every street corner in cities large and small. Fast foods contribute to energy intake, and depending on the food choices made, provide foods and nutrients that should be decreased in the diet. As Americans have become more conscious of their risk factors for heart disease and recognized eating patterns as a contributor to blood cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, obesity, and diabetes, the fast food industry has attempted to adjust their menus to provide more healthful choices. The Roundtable discussion in this issue of the Journal will focus on the importance of this industry as a source of foods that could help address our population-wide efforts to reduce cardiovascular disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-10
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Lipidology
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Fast Foods
Diet
Food
Food Industry
Restaurants
Energy Intake
Heart Diseases
Industry
Cardiovascular Diseases
Obesity
Eating
Cholesterol
Hypertension
Costs and Cost Analysis
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Brown, W. Virgil ; Carson, Jo Ann S. ; Johnson, Rachel K. ; Kris-Etherton, Penny Margaret. / JCL Roundtable : Fast food and the American diet. In: Journal of Clinical Lipidology. 2015 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 3-10.
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JCL Roundtable : Fast food and the American diet. / Brown, W. Virgil; Carson, Jo Ann S.; Johnson, Rachel K.; Kris-Etherton, Penny Margaret.

In: Journal of Clinical Lipidology, Vol. 9, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 3-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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