Jus and Lex in Russian Law

A Discussion Agenda

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Whether and to what extent the 'rule of law' existed in the past and/or exists in Russia has become a matter of overriding concern. Perceptions of the rule of law influence foreign investment decisions by multinational companies and investment funds, foreign assistance programmes by international organizations and governments, tourism, the funding and allocation of law enforcement resources, and the depth of commitment to a transition to a market economy. This chapter employs linguistic analysis to show how differently law sits in Russian culture as compared to that of the West. It argues that the absence of consensus about the existence and substance of jus in Russian legal doctrine is disturbing. The heritage of Soviet legal doctrine, a vulgar Marxism positivism, needs to be completely replaced by something consistent with a true rule jus consistent with modern ideas of justness and right.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLaw and Informal Practices: The Post-Communist Experience
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780191698606
ISBN (Print)9780199259366
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 22 2012

Fingerprint

constitutional state
doctrine
positivism
Law
Marxism
International Organizations
law enforcement
market economy
foreign investment
Russia
assistance
funding
Tourism
commitment
linguistics
resources

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Butler, W. E. (2012). Jus and Lex in Russian Law: A Discussion Agenda. In Law and Informal Practices: The Post-Communist Experience Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199259366.003.0003
Butler, William Elliott. / Jus and Lex in Russian Law : A Discussion Agenda. Law and Informal Practices: The Post-Communist Experience. Oxford University Press, 2012.
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Butler, WE 2012, Jus and Lex in Russian Law: A Discussion Agenda. in Law and Informal Practices: The Post-Communist Experience. Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199259366.003.0003

Jus and Lex in Russian Law : A Discussion Agenda. / Butler, William Elliott.

Law and Informal Practices: The Post-Communist Experience. Oxford University Press, 2012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Butler WE. Jus and Lex in Russian Law: A Discussion Agenda. In Law and Informal Practices: The Post-Communist Experience. Oxford University Press. 2012 https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199259366.003.0003