Kids into health careers: A rural initiative

Lori S. Lauver, Beth Ann Swan, Margaret Mary West, Ksenia Zukowsky, Mary Powell, Tony Frisby, Sue Neyhard, Alexis Marsella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To describe a project that introduces middle school and high school students living in Pennsylvania's rural geographic regions to nursing careers through outreach extended to students regardless of gender, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status. Method: The authors employed many strategies to inform students about careers in nursing. The methods included: working with guidance counselors, participating in community health fairs, taking part in school health career fairs, collaborating with Area Health Education Centers, serving on volunteer local education advisory boards, developing a health careers resource guide, and establishing a rural health advisory board. Findings: Developing developmentally appropriate programs may have the potential to pique interest in nursing careers in children of all ages, preschool through high school. Publicity is needed to alert the community of kids into health care career programs. Timing is essential when planning visits to discuss health care professions opportunities with middle and high school students. It is important to increase the number of high school student contacts during the fall months. Targeting high school seniors is particularly important as they begin the college applications process and determine which school will best meet their educational goals. Conclusions: Outcome measures to determine the success of health career programs for students in preschool through high school are needed. Evaluation methods will be continued over the coming years to assess effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)114-121
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Rural Health
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

Fingerprint

Health
Students
Health Fairs
Nursing
Area Health Education Centers
Delivery of Health Care
Rural Health
Health Occupations
School Health Services
Health Resources
Social Class
Volunteers
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Lauver, L. S., Swan, B. A., West, M. M., Zukowsky, K., Powell, M., Frisby, T., ... Marsella, A. (2011). Kids into health careers: A rural initiative. Journal of Rural Health, 27(1), 114-121. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-0361.2010.00316.x
Lauver, Lori S. ; Swan, Beth Ann ; West, Margaret Mary ; Zukowsky, Ksenia ; Powell, Mary ; Frisby, Tony ; Neyhard, Sue ; Marsella, Alexis. / Kids into health careers : A rural initiative. In: Journal of Rural Health. 2011 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 114-121.
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Lauver, LS, Swan, BA, West, MM, Zukowsky, K, Powell, M, Frisby, T, Neyhard, S & Marsella, A 2011, 'Kids into health careers: A rural initiative', Journal of Rural Health, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 114-121. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-0361.2010.00316.x

Kids into health careers : A rural initiative. / Lauver, Lori S.; Swan, Beth Ann; West, Margaret Mary; Zukowsky, Ksenia; Powell, Mary; Frisby, Tony; Neyhard, Sue; Marsella, Alexis.

In: Journal of Rural Health, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.12.2011, p. 114-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Lauver LS, Swan BA, West MM, Zukowsky K, Powell M, Frisby T et al. Kids into health careers: A rural initiative. Journal of Rural Health. 2011 Dec 1;27(1):114-121. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-0361.2010.00316.x