Kinetic analysis shows that iron deficiency decreases liver vitamin A mobilization in rats

Jing Tsz Jang, Joanne Balmer Green, John L. Beard, Michael Henry Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In view of evidence that nutritional status of iron and vitamin A may affect the other nutrient's metabolism, we used model-based compartmental analysis to examine effects of iron deficiency on whole-body vitamin A dynamics in rats. Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed the AIN93G diet with 2.5 nmol retinyl palmitate/g and either 45 [control (CN)] or 4 μg/g Fe [iron-deficient (ID)] for 8 wk. ID rats consumed food ad libitum; CN rats were food-restricted so that their body weights were the same as ID rats. Two rats/group were killed; liver vitamin A was determined and used for vitamin A balance calculations. [3H]Retinol-labeled plasma was administered intravenously to remaining rats, and 27 serial blood samples were collected for 7 wk. At killing, plasma vitamin A was 0.52 (+) 0.12 (ID, n = 5) vs. 1.34 (+) 0.12 μmol/L (CN, n = 6; P < 0.001), and liver vitamin A was 809 (+) 94 (ID) vs. 112 (+) 24 nmol (CN, P < 0.001). Plasma tracer data were fit to a three- or four-compartment model using the Simulation, Analysis and Modeling computer program and kinetic parameters were calculated. Vitamin A transfer rate between the retinyl ester storage pool [14 (+) 3 (ID) vs. 24 (+) 4 nmol/d (CN), P < 0.05] and plasma was lower in ID rats. Vitamin A remained longer in the body [44 (+) 11 (ID) vs. 22 (+) 3 d (CN), P < 0.05]. Adjusted mean disposal rate was lower in ID (10.0) than CN rats (19.9 nmol/d), as was estimated vitamin A absorption efficiency [58% (ID) vs. 76% (CN)]. Our results suggest that iron deficiency inhibits mobilization of vitamin A stores and may decrease the absorption and irreversible utilization of vitamin A.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1291-1296
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume130
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 11 2000

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Vitamin A
Iron
Liver
Food
Nutritional Status
Sprague Dawley Rats
Esters
Software
Body Weight
Diet

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Jang, J. T., Green, J. B., Beard, J. L., & Green, M. H. (2000). Kinetic analysis shows that iron deficiency decreases liver vitamin A mobilization in rats. Journal of Nutrition, 130(5), 1291-1296.
Jang, Jing Tsz ; Green, Joanne Balmer ; Beard, John L. ; Green, Michael Henry. / Kinetic analysis shows that iron deficiency decreases liver vitamin A mobilization in rats. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2000 ; Vol. 130, No. 5. pp. 1291-1296.
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abstract = "In view of evidence that nutritional status of iron and vitamin A may affect the other nutrient's metabolism, we used model-based compartmental analysis to examine effects of iron deficiency on whole-body vitamin A dynamics in rats. Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed the AIN93G diet with 2.5 nmol retinyl palmitate/g and either 45 [control (CN)] or 4 μg/g Fe [iron-deficient (ID)] for 8 wk. ID rats consumed food ad libitum; CN rats were food-restricted so that their body weights were the same as ID rats. Two rats/group were killed; liver vitamin A was determined and used for vitamin A balance calculations. [3H]Retinol-labeled plasma was administered intravenously to remaining rats, and 27 serial blood samples were collected for 7 wk. At killing, plasma vitamin A was 0.52 (+) 0.12 (ID, n = 5) vs. 1.34 (+) 0.12 μmol/L (CN, n = 6; P < 0.001), and liver vitamin A was 809 (+) 94 (ID) vs. 112 (+) 24 nmol (CN, P < 0.001). Plasma tracer data were fit to a three- or four-compartment model using the Simulation, Analysis and Modeling computer program and kinetic parameters were calculated. Vitamin A transfer rate between the retinyl ester storage pool [14 (+) 3 (ID) vs. 24 (+) 4 nmol/d (CN), P < 0.05] and plasma was lower in ID rats. Vitamin A remained longer in the body [44 (+) 11 (ID) vs. 22 (+) 3 d (CN), P < 0.05]. Adjusted mean disposal rate was lower in ID (10.0) than CN rats (19.9 nmol/d), as was estimated vitamin A absorption efficiency [58{\%} (ID) vs. 76{\%} (CN)]. Our results suggest that iron deficiency inhibits mobilization of vitamin A stores and may decrease the absorption and irreversible utilization of vitamin A.",
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Jang, JT, Green, JB, Beard, JL & Green, MH 2000, 'Kinetic analysis shows that iron deficiency decreases liver vitamin A mobilization in rats', Journal of Nutrition, vol. 130, no. 5, pp. 1291-1296.

Kinetic analysis shows that iron deficiency decreases liver vitamin A mobilization in rats. / Jang, Jing Tsz; Green, Joanne Balmer; Beard, John L.; Green, Michael Henry.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 130, No. 5, 11.05.2000, p. 1291-1296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - In view of evidence that nutritional status of iron and vitamin A may affect the other nutrient's metabolism, we used model-based compartmental analysis to examine effects of iron deficiency on whole-body vitamin A dynamics in rats. Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed the AIN93G diet with 2.5 nmol retinyl palmitate/g and either 45 [control (CN)] or 4 μg/g Fe [iron-deficient (ID)] for 8 wk. ID rats consumed food ad libitum; CN rats were food-restricted so that their body weights were the same as ID rats. Two rats/group were killed; liver vitamin A was determined and used for vitamin A balance calculations. [3H]Retinol-labeled plasma was administered intravenously to remaining rats, and 27 serial blood samples were collected for 7 wk. At killing, plasma vitamin A was 0.52 (+) 0.12 (ID, n = 5) vs. 1.34 (+) 0.12 μmol/L (CN, n = 6; P < 0.001), and liver vitamin A was 809 (+) 94 (ID) vs. 112 (+) 24 nmol (CN, P < 0.001). Plasma tracer data were fit to a three- or four-compartment model using the Simulation, Analysis and Modeling computer program and kinetic parameters were calculated. Vitamin A transfer rate between the retinyl ester storage pool [14 (+) 3 (ID) vs. 24 (+) 4 nmol/d (CN), P < 0.05] and plasma was lower in ID rats. Vitamin A remained longer in the body [44 (+) 11 (ID) vs. 22 (+) 3 d (CN), P < 0.05]. Adjusted mean disposal rate was lower in ID (10.0) than CN rats (19.9 nmol/d), as was estimated vitamin A absorption efficiency [58% (ID) vs. 76% (CN)]. Our results suggest that iron deficiency inhibits mobilization of vitamin A stores and may decrease the absorption and irreversible utilization of vitamin A.

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