Knee popping and clicking in a pediatric athlete

meniscal injury or sports tumor?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This case report presents a teenage patient who initially was thought to have a sports-related injury but ultimately was diagnosed with a primary soft tissue tumor. A previously healthy 16-year-old softball player presented with a history of left knee joint line pain, clicking, and swelling. The patient was presumed to have a lateral meniscus tear. However, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an intra-articular mass. Arthroscopy revealed a 2.5- × 1.5-cm firm pedicular mass in the lateral joint. Histological exam demonstrated localized pigmented villonodular synovitis. The patient healed uneventfully and returned to sporting activities. This report re-emphasizes the possibility that "sports tumors" can mimic symptoms of a meniscal tear in young athletes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-278
Number of pages4
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

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Athletic Injuries
Athletes
Knee
Pediatrics
Joints
Baseball
Phthiraptera
Tibial Meniscus
Neoplasms
Arthroscopy
Arthralgia
Knee Joint
Tears
Sports
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Knee popping and clicking in a pediatric athlete: meniscal injury or sports tumor?",
abstract = "This case report presents a teenage patient who initially was thought to have a sports-related injury but ultimately was diagnosed with a primary soft tissue tumor. A previously healthy 16-year-old softball player presented with a history of left knee joint line pain, clicking, and swelling. The patient was presumed to have a lateral meniscus tear. However, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an intra-articular mass. Arthroscopy revealed a 2.5- × 1.5-cm firm pedicular mass in the lateral joint. Histological exam demonstrated localized pigmented villonodular synovitis. The patient healed uneventfully and returned to sporting activities. This report re-emphasizes the possibility that {"}sports tumors{"} can mimic symptoms of a meniscal tear in young athletes.",
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Knee popping and clicking in a pediatric athlete : meniscal injury or sports tumor? / Plakke, Michael J.; Hennrikus, William L.; Frauenhoffer, Elizabeth E.

In: Unknown Journal, Vol. 21, No. 4, 01.01.2012, p. 275-278.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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