Knowing versus doing: Education and training needs of staff in a chronic care hospital unit for individuals with Dementia

Katherine A. Marx, Ian H. Stanley, Kimberly van Haitsma, Jennifer Moody, Dana Alonzi, Bryan R. Hansen, Laura N. Gitlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hospital clinical staff routinely confront challenging behaviors in patients with dementia with limited training in prevention and management. The authors of the current article conducted a survey of staff on a chronic care hospital unit concerning knowledge about dementia, perceived educational needs, and the care environment. The overall mean score for a 27-item knowledge scale was 24.08 (SD = 2.61), refl ecting high level of disease knowledge. However, staff indicated a need for more information and skills, specifi cally for managing behaviors nonpharmacologically (92.3%), enhancing patient safety (89.7%), coping with care challenges (84.2%), and involving patients in activities (81.6%). Although most staff (i.e., nurses [80%] and therapists [86.4%]) believed their care contributed a great deal to patient well-being, approximately 75% reported frustration and being overwhelmed by dementia care. Most reported being hit, bitten, or physically hurt by patients (66.7%), as well as disrespected by families (53.8%). Findings suggest that staff have foundational knowledge but lack the "how-to" or handson skills necessary to implement nonpharmacological behavioral management approaches and communicate with families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-34
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of gerontological nursing
Volume40
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)
  • Gerontology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Knowing versus doing: Education and training needs of staff in a chronic care hospital unit for individuals with Dementia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this