Knowledge and attitudes about HIV/AIDS among community-living older women: Reexamining issues of age and gender

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Abstract

Although older women face unique risks related to HIV/ AIDS, little empirical data is available regarding HIV/AIDS among women over the age of 65. In the present study, 160 community-living older women and men completed questionnaires regarding knowledge and attitudes about HIV/AIDS. Findings showed that although older women were less likely to talk to their physician about HIV than men, they maintained greater knowledge and generally dispelled myths about viral transmission. However, most older women believed that HIV/AIDS had limited personal relevance, possessed virtually no knowledge of age and gender specific risk factors, and professed HIV-associated stigma. These findings highlight the need for gender and age specific prevention programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-67
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Women and Aging
Volume19
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 19 2007

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women's issues
Interpersonal Relations
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
HIV
gender
community
myth
physician
questionnaire
Physicians

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

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abstract = "Although older women face unique risks related to HIV/ AIDS, little empirical data is available regarding HIV/AIDS among women over the age of 65. In the present study, 160 community-living older women and men completed questionnaires regarding knowledge and attitudes about HIV/AIDS. Findings showed that although older women were less likely to talk to their physician about HIV than men, they maintained greater knowledge and generally dispelled myths about viral transmission. However, most older women believed that HIV/AIDS had limited personal relevance, possessed virtually no knowledge of age and gender specific risk factors, and professed HIV-associated stigma. These findings highlight the need for gender and age specific prevention programs.",
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