Knowledge, attitudes, and decision making in hospital glycemic management

are faculty up to speed?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Knowledge and confidence deficits in the management of hospital glucose abnormalities are prevalent among resident physicians. However, it is unclear whether such gaps prevail among faculty within different professional fields. In this study, we examined faculty knowledge and explored perceptions of challenges related to the management of inpatient hyperglycemia and diabetes.

METHODS: We conducted a survey that examined management decisions about inpatient hyperglycemia and diabetes among Medicine, Medicine/Pediatrics, Family and Community Medicine, Surgery, and Neurology faculty clinicians. All participating faculty had teaching and patient care responsibilities.

RESULTS: Responses from 69 faculty participants revealed gaps in several areas, including biomedical and contextual knowledge, familiarity with resources, clinical decision making, and self-efficacy. We identified important factors perceived as barriers to optimal glycemic management in the inpatient settings.

CONCLUSION: The results of this study enhance our insight about the limitations existing among faculty related to the management of hyperglycemia and diabetes in hospitalized patients. We suggest that these barriers may impede optimization of patient care. Faculty play a crucial role in the clinical decision-making process and quality of care delivered by trainees. Therefore, attending physicians are likely to impact trainees' clinical performance and competency in the management of inpatient diabetes during training and beyond. Education in this subject should be a priority among trainees and faculty alike.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-322
Number of pages16
JournalEndocrine Practice
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Fingerprint

Decision Making
Inpatients
Hyperglycemia
Patient Care
Medicine
Community Medicine
Physicians
Clinical Competence
Quality of Health Care
Self Efficacy
Neurology
Teaching
Pediatrics
Education
Glucose

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

@article{fcf3afd2651c48189f91e6df9c956d6d,
title = "Knowledge, attitudes, and decision making in hospital glycemic management: are faculty up to speed?",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Knowledge and confidence deficits in the management of hospital glucose abnormalities are prevalent among resident physicians. However, it is unclear whether such gaps prevail among faculty within different professional fields. In this study, we examined faculty knowledge and explored perceptions of challenges related to the management of inpatient hyperglycemia and diabetes.METHODS: We conducted a survey that examined management decisions about inpatient hyperglycemia and diabetes among Medicine, Medicine/Pediatrics, Family and Community Medicine, Surgery, and Neurology faculty clinicians. All participating faculty had teaching and patient care responsibilities.RESULTS: Responses from 69 faculty participants revealed gaps in several areas, including biomedical and contextual knowledge, familiarity with resources, clinical decision making, and self-efficacy. We identified important factors perceived as barriers to optimal glycemic management in the inpatient settings.CONCLUSION: The results of this study enhance our insight about the limitations existing among faculty related to the management of hyperglycemia and diabetes in hospitalized patients. We suggest that these barriers may impede optimization of patient care. Faculty play a crucial role in the clinical decision-making process and quality of care delivered by trainees. Therefore, attending physicians are likely to impact trainees' clinical performance and competency in the management of inpatient diabetes during training and beyond. Education in this subject should be a priority among trainees and faculty alike.",
author = "Ariana Pichardo-Lowden and Lan Kong and Paul Haidet",
year = "2015",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4158/EP14246.OR",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "307--322",
journal = "Endocrine Practice",
issn = "1530-891X",
publisher = "American Association of Clinical Endocrinology",
number = "4",

}

Knowledge, attitudes, and decision making in hospital glycemic management : are faculty up to speed? / Pichardo-Lowden, Ariana; Kong, Lan; Haidet, Paul.

In: Endocrine Practice, Vol. 21, No. 4, 01.04.2015, p. 307-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Knowledge, attitudes, and decision making in hospital glycemic management

T2 - are faculty up to speed?

AU - Pichardo-Lowden, Ariana

AU - Kong, Lan

AU - Haidet, Paul

PY - 2015/4/1

Y1 - 2015/4/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Knowledge and confidence deficits in the management of hospital glucose abnormalities are prevalent among resident physicians. However, it is unclear whether such gaps prevail among faculty within different professional fields. In this study, we examined faculty knowledge and explored perceptions of challenges related to the management of inpatient hyperglycemia and diabetes.METHODS: We conducted a survey that examined management decisions about inpatient hyperglycemia and diabetes among Medicine, Medicine/Pediatrics, Family and Community Medicine, Surgery, and Neurology faculty clinicians. All participating faculty had teaching and patient care responsibilities.RESULTS: Responses from 69 faculty participants revealed gaps in several areas, including biomedical and contextual knowledge, familiarity with resources, clinical decision making, and self-efficacy. We identified important factors perceived as barriers to optimal glycemic management in the inpatient settings.CONCLUSION: The results of this study enhance our insight about the limitations existing among faculty related to the management of hyperglycemia and diabetes in hospitalized patients. We suggest that these barriers may impede optimization of patient care. Faculty play a crucial role in the clinical decision-making process and quality of care delivered by trainees. Therefore, attending physicians are likely to impact trainees' clinical performance and competency in the management of inpatient diabetes during training and beyond. Education in this subject should be a priority among trainees and faculty alike.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Knowledge and confidence deficits in the management of hospital glucose abnormalities are prevalent among resident physicians. However, it is unclear whether such gaps prevail among faculty within different professional fields. In this study, we examined faculty knowledge and explored perceptions of challenges related to the management of inpatient hyperglycemia and diabetes.METHODS: We conducted a survey that examined management decisions about inpatient hyperglycemia and diabetes among Medicine, Medicine/Pediatrics, Family and Community Medicine, Surgery, and Neurology faculty clinicians. All participating faculty had teaching and patient care responsibilities.RESULTS: Responses from 69 faculty participants revealed gaps in several areas, including biomedical and contextual knowledge, familiarity with resources, clinical decision making, and self-efficacy. We identified important factors perceived as barriers to optimal glycemic management in the inpatient settings.CONCLUSION: The results of this study enhance our insight about the limitations existing among faculty related to the management of hyperglycemia and diabetes in hospitalized patients. We suggest that these barriers may impede optimization of patient care. Faculty play a crucial role in the clinical decision-making process and quality of care delivered by trainees. Therefore, attending physicians are likely to impact trainees' clinical performance and competency in the management of inpatient diabetes during training and beyond. Education in this subject should be a priority among trainees and faculty alike.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84982972443&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84982972443&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4158/EP14246.OR

DO - 10.4158/EP14246.OR

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 307

EP - 322

JO - Endocrine Practice

JF - Endocrine Practice

SN - 1530-891X

IS - 4

ER -