Knowledge of human papillomavirus and perceived barriers to vaccination in a sample of us female college students

James Dillard, Margaret E. Spear

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) and perceived barriers to being vaccinated against the virus. Participants: Three hundred ninety-six undergraduate women enrolled at Penn State University in Fall 2008. Methods: A random sample of students were invited to participate in a Web-based survey. Results: Awareness of HPV and the vaccine was high, but knowledge of HPV-related facts averaged only 65% overall. Knowledge was significantly predicted by frequency of media exposure and physician encouragement to be vaccinated, but not by the number of sex partners nor the frequency of condom/dental dam use. On average, women indicated that 2 of the 10 barriers listed applied to them. Physician encouragement negatively predicted barriers at p =.066. No other predictors approached significance. Conclusions: Serious misconceptions remain about specific aspects of the diseases and how they are acquired. Health education efforts are needed to improve knowledge in college populations and counteract perceived barriers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)186-190
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011

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Vaccination
Students
Physicians
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Condoms
Health Education
Tooth
Viruses
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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Knowledge of human papillomavirus and perceived barriers to vaccination in a sample of us female college students. / Dillard, James; Spear, Margaret E.

In: Journal of American College Health, Vol. 59, No. 3, 01.11.2011, p. 186-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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