Label management

Investigating how confidants encourage the use of communication strategies to avoid stigmatization

Rachel Annette Smith, Thomas J. Hipper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In modified labeling theory, Link and colleagues (1987, 1989) explicate how people use communication to cope with being labeled as members of a stigmatized group. In this paper, we change perspectives and investigate how a confidant's awareness of discrimination and devaluation associated with being labeled as a member of a stigmatized group ("mentally ill" or "smoker") motivates him or her to encourage a labeled loved one to engage in secrecy, withdrawal, or education to avoid the adverse actions associated with stigmatization. Results showed that a model of relationships among perceived devaluation and discrimination, coping strategies, and future disclosures extended well to unexpected confidants of a labeled loved one. This advice included encouraging the labeled loved one not to tell different people about their condition, which included health care providers. These findings also showed that people with experience in the labeling condition may have particular concern about stigmatization or rejection from different types of listeners, including close friends and health care providers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)410-422
Number of pages13
JournalHealth Communication
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 5 2010

Fingerprint

Stereotyping
stigmatization
Health care
Health Personnel
Labeling
Labels
devaluation
Communication
communication
Confidentiality
Mentally Ill Persons
Disclosure
discrimination
management
health care
Education
secrecy
listener
withdrawal
coping

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

Cite this

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Label management : Investigating how confidants encourage the use of communication strategies to avoid stigmatization. / Smith, Rachel Annette; Hipper, Thomas J.

In: Health Communication, Vol. 25, No. 5, 05.08.2010, p. 410-422.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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