Labor migration and child mortality in Mozambique

Scott Thomas Yabiku, Victor Agadjanian, Boaventura Cau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Male labor migration is widespread in many parts of the world, yet its consequences for child outcomes and especially childhood mortality remain unclear. Male labor migration could bring benefits, in the form of remittances, to the families that remain behind and thus help child survival. Alternatively, the absence of a male adult could imperil the household's well-being and its ability to care for its members, increasing child mortality risks. In this analysis, we use longitudinal survey data from Mozambique collected in 2006 and 2009 to examine the association between male labor migration and under-five mortality in families that remain behind. Using a simple migrant/non-migrant dichotomy, we find no difference in mortality rates across migrant and non-migrant men's children. When we separated successful from unsuccessful migration based on the wife's perception, however, stark contrasts emerge: children of successful migrants have the lowest mortality, followed by children of non-migrant men, followed by the children of unsuccessful migrants. Our results illustrate the need to account for the diversity of men's labor migration experience in examining the effects of migration on left-behind households.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2530-2538
Number of pages9
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume75
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

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Mozambique
Child Mortality
labor migration
Emigration and Immigration
mortality
migrant
Mortality
Aptitude
migration
Spouses
Longitudinal Studies
Economics
Labour Migration
wife
Survival
well-being
childhood
Migrants
ability

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Yabiku, Scott Thomas ; Agadjanian, Victor ; Cau, Boaventura. / Labor migration and child mortality in Mozambique. In: Social Science and Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 75, No. 12. pp. 2530-2538.
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Labor migration and child mortality in Mozambique. / Yabiku, Scott Thomas; Agadjanian, Victor; Cau, Boaventura.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 75, No. 12, 01.12.2012, p. 2530-2538.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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