Language processing in age-related macular degeneration associated with unique functional connectivity signatures in the right hemisphere

Jie Zhuang, David J. Madden, Xuan Duong-Fernandez, Nan kuei Chen, Scott W. Cousins, Guy G. Potter, Michele T. Diaz, Heather E. Whitson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal disease associated with significant vision loss among older adults. Previous large-scale behavioral studies indicate that people with AMD are at increased risk of cognitive deficits in language processing, particularly in verbal fluency tasks. The neural underpinnings of any relationship between AMD and higher cognitive functions, such as language processing, remain unclear. This study aims to address this issue using independent component analysis of spontaneous brain activity at rest. In 2 components associated with visual processing, we observed weaker functional connectivity in the primary visual cortex and lateral occipital cortex in AMD patients compared with healthy controls, indicating that AMD might lead to differences in the neural representation of vision. In a component related to language processing, we found that increasing connectivity within the right inferior frontal gyrus was associated with better verbal fluency performance across all older adults, and the verbal fluency effect was greater in AMD patients than controls in both right inferior frontal gyrus and right posterior temporal regions. As the behavioral performance of our patients is as good as that of controls, these findings suggest that preservation of verbal fluency performance in AMD patients might be achieved through higher contribution from right hemisphere regions in bilateral language networks. If that is the case, there may be an opportunity to promote cognitive resilience among seniors with AMD or other forms of late-life vision loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-74
Number of pages10
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume63
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

Fingerprint

Macular Degeneration
Language
Prefrontal Cortex
Retinal Diseases
Occipital Lobe
Visual Cortex
Temporal Lobe
Cognition
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Aging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Zhuang, Jie ; Madden, David J. ; Duong-Fernandez, Xuan ; Chen, Nan kuei ; Cousins, Scott W. ; Potter, Guy G. ; Diaz, Michele T. ; Whitson, Heather E. / Language processing in age-related macular degeneration associated with unique functional connectivity signatures in the right hemisphere. In: Neurobiology of Aging. 2018 ; Vol. 63. pp. 65-74.
@article{77d140437f374ca48a8f471f30340002,
title = "Language processing in age-related macular degeneration associated with unique functional connectivity signatures in the right hemisphere",
abstract = "Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal disease associated with significant vision loss among older adults. Previous large-scale behavioral studies indicate that people with AMD are at increased risk of cognitive deficits in language processing, particularly in verbal fluency tasks. The neural underpinnings of any relationship between AMD and higher cognitive functions, such as language processing, remain unclear. This study aims to address this issue using independent component analysis of spontaneous brain activity at rest. In 2 components associated with visual processing, we observed weaker functional connectivity in the primary visual cortex and lateral occipital cortex in AMD patients compared with healthy controls, indicating that AMD might lead to differences in the neural representation of vision. In a component related to language processing, we found that increasing connectivity within the right inferior frontal gyrus was associated with better verbal fluency performance across all older adults, and the verbal fluency effect was greater in AMD patients than controls in both right inferior frontal gyrus and right posterior temporal regions. As the behavioral performance of our patients is as good as that of controls, these findings suggest that preservation of verbal fluency performance in AMD patients might be achieved through higher contribution from right hemisphere regions in bilateral language networks. If that is the case, there may be an opportunity to promote cognitive resilience among seniors with AMD or other forms of late-life vision loss.",
author = "Jie Zhuang and Madden, {David J.} and Xuan Duong-Fernandez and Chen, {Nan kuei} and Cousins, {Scott W.} and Potter, {Guy G.} and Diaz, {Michele T.} and Whitson, {Heather E.}",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.11.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "63",
pages = "65--74",
journal = "Neurobiology of Aging",
issn = "0197-4580",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

Language processing in age-related macular degeneration associated with unique functional connectivity signatures in the right hemisphere. / Zhuang, Jie; Madden, David J.; Duong-Fernandez, Xuan; Chen, Nan kuei; Cousins, Scott W.; Potter, Guy G.; Diaz, Michele T.; Whitson, Heather E.

In: Neurobiology of Aging, Vol. 63, 03.2018, p. 65-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Language processing in age-related macular degeneration associated with unique functional connectivity signatures in the right hemisphere

AU - Zhuang, Jie

AU - Madden, David J.

AU - Duong-Fernandez, Xuan

AU - Chen, Nan kuei

AU - Cousins, Scott W.

AU - Potter, Guy G.

AU - Diaz, Michele T.

AU - Whitson, Heather E.

PY - 2018/3

Y1 - 2018/3

N2 - Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal disease associated with significant vision loss among older adults. Previous large-scale behavioral studies indicate that people with AMD are at increased risk of cognitive deficits in language processing, particularly in verbal fluency tasks. The neural underpinnings of any relationship between AMD and higher cognitive functions, such as language processing, remain unclear. This study aims to address this issue using independent component analysis of spontaneous brain activity at rest. In 2 components associated with visual processing, we observed weaker functional connectivity in the primary visual cortex and lateral occipital cortex in AMD patients compared with healthy controls, indicating that AMD might lead to differences in the neural representation of vision. In a component related to language processing, we found that increasing connectivity within the right inferior frontal gyrus was associated with better verbal fluency performance across all older adults, and the verbal fluency effect was greater in AMD patients than controls in both right inferior frontal gyrus and right posterior temporal regions. As the behavioral performance of our patients is as good as that of controls, these findings suggest that preservation of verbal fluency performance in AMD patients might be achieved through higher contribution from right hemisphere regions in bilateral language networks. If that is the case, there may be an opportunity to promote cognitive resilience among seniors with AMD or other forms of late-life vision loss.

AB - Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal disease associated with significant vision loss among older adults. Previous large-scale behavioral studies indicate that people with AMD are at increased risk of cognitive deficits in language processing, particularly in verbal fluency tasks. The neural underpinnings of any relationship between AMD and higher cognitive functions, such as language processing, remain unclear. This study aims to address this issue using independent component analysis of spontaneous brain activity at rest. In 2 components associated with visual processing, we observed weaker functional connectivity in the primary visual cortex and lateral occipital cortex in AMD patients compared with healthy controls, indicating that AMD might lead to differences in the neural representation of vision. In a component related to language processing, we found that increasing connectivity within the right inferior frontal gyrus was associated with better verbal fluency performance across all older adults, and the verbal fluency effect was greater in AMD patients than controls in both right inferior frontal gyrus and right posterior temporal regions. As the behavioral performance of our patients is as good as that of controls, these findings suggest that preservation of verbal fluency performance in AMD patients might be achieved through higher contribution from right hemisphere regions in bilateral language networks. If that is the case, there may be an opportunity to promote cognitive resilience among seniors with AMD or other forms of late-life vision loss.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85037606926&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85037606926&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.11.003

DO - 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.11.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 29223681

AN - SCOPUS:85037606926

VL - 63

SP - 65

EP - 74

JO - Neurobiology of Aging

JF - Neurobiology of Aging

SN - 0197-4580

ER -