Large-scale traditional neighbourhood development and pre-emptive ecosystem planning: The Markham experience, 1989-2001

David L.A. Gordon, Kenneth Tamminga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Environmental protection and restoration in 10 suburban community plans are compared to the recommendations of an innovative Natural Features Study (NFS) of Markham, Ontario. The secondary plans will accommodate 150 000 people and are North America's largest concentration of new communities planned with traditional neighbourhood design principles. Their planning and development is an early test of whether New Urbanism can collaborate with pre-emptive ecosystem planning. The results of the comparison indicate that the plans met or exceeded most objectives for environmental protection. The record on environmental restoration is mixed, with several proposed links lost during the design and development process, perhaps because the NFS was not adopted as official policy before neighbourhood planning began. It appears that environmental restoration is best approached on a regional basis, with plans and financial incentives in place before land is subject to development pressure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)321-340
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Urban Design
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002

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environmental restoration
restoration
natural feature
planning
ecosystem
environmental protection
experience
neighborhood policy
community
incentive
plan
Ecosystem
Restoration
Planning
Environmental Protection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

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Large-scale traditional neighbourhood development and pre-emptive ecosystem planning : The Markham experience, 1989-2001. / Gordon, David L.A.; Tamminga, Kenneth.

In: Journal of Urban Design, Vol. 7, No. 3, 01.10.2002, p. 321-340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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